Is it possible to use raw hdd partition as scratch disk/space?

SP
Posted By
Steven_Peckins
Jul 18, 2008
Views
351
Replies
2
Status
Closed
I’m currently building a workstation specifically for certain image processing tasks. I plan to run Linux most of the time but am considering dual boot with Windows, specifically to run Photoshop.

It will have four 15k 73GB SAS drives configured as two RAID0 volumes for scratch disks. I’m laying out the partitions now, and I was wondering if Photoshop can use raw partitions as scratch space, or do they always have to be Windows-formatted partitions. What I’m thinking about is recycling my Linux swap partitions from the RAID0s as scratch partitions when using Photoshop.

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Not_Ann_Shelbourne
Jul 18, 2008
I don’t think Windows Explorer can see any Linux partitions. I can’t on my system.

< http://www.howtoforge.com/access-linux-partitions-from-windo ws>
SP
Steven_Peckins
Jul 20, 2008
I know Windows doesn’t natively recognize Linux filesystems (and swap space isn’t ext2/3), but I was wondering if Photoshop perhaps possessed some ill-known component to its proprietary scratch disk/swap file code that allowed access to raw partitions. Some database programs have something like this that cuts out the overhead of the filesystem layer.

This isn’t quite what I was talking about, but it looks like it’s as close as I can get:

< http://www.uselinux.org/index.php?option=com_content&tas k=view&id=23&Itemid=34>

Essentially you create a Windows filesystem on your intended swap partition, then back it up and zip it in Linux using the dd utility, reformat as swap, and automatically restore the empty Windows partition before shutting down.

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