Engraved/Woodcut Effect

TM
Posted By
The Magician
Oct 12, 2006
Views
789
Replies
11
Status
Closed
Been searching for some kind of Engraved/Woodcut effect like they do on faces in the New York Times.
I was wondering what the actual process is that they use in the newspaper… and if it’s possible to achieve it using Photoshop. I tried a few filters by Andromeda, etc., but so far have not found a filter or a way to duplicate this effect exactly.
Any ideas…?
Here’s an example:
http://www.edimsum.net/archives/vagabond/vagabond031902.jpg

Thanks a bunch!
Da Magish

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S
Stewy
Oct 13, 2006
In article ,
The Magician wrote:

Been searching for some kind of Engraved/Woodcut effect like they do on faces in the New York Times.
I was wondering what the actual process is that they use in the newspaper… and if it’s possible to achieve it using Photoshop. I tried a few filters by Andromeda, etc., but so far have not found a filter or a way to duplicate this effect exactly.
Any ideas…?
Here’s an example:
http://www.edimsum.net/archives/vagabond/vagabond031902.jpg
Years ago I bought a box of 8×10 Lith film. This was high contrast film safe to use under an orange safelight.

Try converting to monochrome and upping the contrast and fiddling about with other filters.

I did see a tutorial to convert pictures into a monochrome graphic and then coloured. using the Gaussian blur.

I’m afraid I can’t describe the exact steps as I moved house last weekend and all my Photoshop tutorials are in a box somewhere <sorry I can’t be more help>
WO
Wizard of Draws
Oct 13, 2006
On 10/12/06 7:50 PM, in article ,
"The Magician" wrote:

Been searching for some kind of Engraved/Woodcut effect like they do on faces in the New York Times.
I was wondering what the actual process is that they use in the newspaper… and if it’s possible to achieve it using Photoshop. I tried a few filters by Andromeda, etc., but so far have not found a filter or a way to duplicate this effect exactly.
Any ideas…?
Here’s an example:
http://www.edimsum.net/archives/vagabond/vagabond031902.jpg
Thanks a bunch!
Da Magish

What you see in that picture tells you all you need to know. It’s done by hand and as far as I know, there’s no filter that will duplicate that effect. Probably never will be a filter that can do it with the same ‘feeling’ that a human is capable of.

Jeff ‘The Wizard of Draws’ Bucchino

Cartoons with a Touch of Magic
http://www.wizardofdraws.com

More Cartoons with a Touch of Magic
http://www.cartoonclipart.com
TM
The Magician
Oct 13, 2006
On Thu, 12 Oct 2006 21:37:56 -0400, Wizard of Draws
wrote:

On 10/12/06 7:50 PM, in article ,
"The Magician" wrote:

Been searching for some kind of Engraved/Woodcut effect like they do on faces in the New York Times.
I was wondering what the actual process is that they use in the newspaper… and if it’s possible to achieve it using Photoshop. I tried a few filters by Andromeda, etc., but so far have not found a filter or a way to duplicate this effect exactly.
Any ideas…?
Here’s an example:
http://www.edimsum.net/archives/vagabond/vagabond031902.jpg
Thanks a bunch!
Da Magish

What you see in that picture tells you all you need to know. It’s done by hand and as far as I know, there’s no filter that will duplicate that effect. Probably never will be a filter that can do it with the same ‘feeling’ that a human is capable of.

Well truthfully, I’m not so sure about that.
I think the picture is actually a faked or trick photograph done for a "whimsical look"…
"The artist drawing an exact duplicate of herself on a mirror". It looks to me like she just posed for it, and someone monkeyed with the mirror reflection after the fact. I think it would be damn near impossible for the artist there to actually duplicate that frozen, EXACT mirror image perpective of herself… mainly because she’s looking at it from an entirely different angle than what we (the camera) is seeing. So HER perspective would look much different to US if she were drawing what SHE saw.
(I hope dat makes sense…)
And they do that very same look for EVERY headshot of article authors and key figures in the New York Times… EVERY single day. I’m not exactly sure what the process USED to be called… woodcut, engraved… or how the used to do it…but I figure it must take an awful lot of time to do that by hand (drawing, engraving, or woodcutting) and it’s probably extremely costly to get someone to do it by hand these days as well. And I don’t think they actually do things like "paste-up" & "airbrushing" etc. anymore thanks to computers, desktop publishing and things like Photoshop etc. So I kinda figured that in these modern, photoshopped, cost effective, time conservative days… there must be a faster, cheaper process to achieve that effect.
Only my thoughts and opinion.
But then again… wuddo I know… yanno…?
MR
Mike Russell
Oct 13, 2006
"The Magician" wrote in message
Been searching for some kind of Engraved/Woodcut effect like they do on faces in the New York Times.
I was wondering what the actual process is that they use in the newspaper… and if it’s possible to achieve it using Photoshop. I tried a few filters by Andromeda, etc., but so far have not found a filter or a way to duplicate this effect exactly.

Try the India Ink plugin from Flaming Pear.
The free version has a generous amount of functionality. —
Mike Russell
www.curvemeister.com/forum/
K
krash
Oct 13, 2006
in art school we studied this technique, it is called pointillism… if that helps… kk


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"The Magician" wrote in message
On Thu, 12 Oct 2006 21:37:56 -0400, Wizard of Draws
wrote:

On 10/12/06 7:50 PM, in article
,
"The Magician" wrote:

Been searching for some kind of Engraved/Woodcut effect like they do on faces in the New York Times.
I was wondering what the actual process is that they use in the newspaper… and if it’s possible to achieve it using Photoshop. I tried a few filters by Andromeda, etc., but so far have not found a filter or a way to duplicate this effect exactly.
Any ideas…?
Here’s an example:
http://www.edimsum.net/archives/vagabond/vagabond031902.jpg
Thanks a bunch!
Da Magish

What you see in that picture tells you all you need to know. It’s done by hand and as far as I know, there’s no filter that will duplicate that effect. Probably never will be a filter that can do it with the same ‘feeling’ that a human is capable of.

Well truthfully, I’m not so sure about that.
I think the picture is actually a faked or trick photograph done for a "whimsical look"…
"The artist drawing an exact duplicate of herself on a mirror". It looks to me like she just posed for it, and someone monkeyed with the mirror reflection after the fact. I think it would be damn near impossible for the artist there to actually duplicate that frozen, EXACT mirror image perpective of herself… mainly because she’s looking at it from an entirely different angle than what we (the camera) is seeing. So HER perspective would look much different to US if she were drawing what SHE saw.
(I hope dat makes sense…)
And they do that very same look for EVERY headshot of article authors and key figures in the New York Times… EVERY single day. I’m not exactly sure what the process USED to be called… woodcut, engraved… or how the used to do it…but I figure it must take an awful lot of time to do that by hand (drawing, engraving, or woodcutting) and it’s probably extremely costly to get someone to do it by hand these days as well. And I don’t think they actually do things like "paste-up" & "airbrushing" etc. anymore thanks to computers, desktop publishing and things like Photoshop etc. So I kinda figured that in these modern, photoshopped, cost effective, time conservative days… there must be a faster, cheaper process to achieve that effect.
Only my thoughts and opinion.
But then again… wuddo I know… yanno…?
WO
Wizard of Draws
Oct 14, 2006
On 10/13/06 12:23 AM, in article ,
"The Magician" wrote:

On Thu, 12 Oct 2006 21:37:56 -0400, Wizard of Draws
wrote:

On 10/12/06 7:50 PM, in article ,
"The Magician" wrote:

Been searching for some kind of Engraved/Woodcut effect like they do on faces in the New York Times.
I was wondering what the actual process is that they use in the newspaper… and if it’s possible to achieve it using Photoshop. I tried a few filters by Andromeda, etc., but so far have not found a filter or a way to duplicate this effect exactly.
Any ideas…?
Here’s an example:
http://www.edimsum.net/archives/vagabond/vagabond031902.jpg
Thanks a bunch!
Da Magish

What you see in that picture tells you all you need to know. It’s done by hand and as far as I know, there’s no filter that will duplicate that effect. Probably never will be a filter that can do it with the same ‘feeling’ that a human is capable of.

Well truthfully, I’m not so sure about that.
I think the picture is actually a faked or trick photograph done for a "whimsical look"…
"The artist drawing an exact duplicate of herself on a mirror". It looks to me like she just posed for it, and someone monkeyed with the mirror reflection after the fact. I think it would be damn near impossible for the artist there to actually duplicate that frozen, EXACT mirror image perpective of herself… mainly because she’s looking at it from an entirely different angle than what we (the camera) is seeing. So HER perspective would look much different to US if she were drawing what SHE saw.
(I hope dat makes sense…)
And they do that very same look for EVERY headshot of article authors and key figures in the New York Times… EVERY single day. I’m not exactly sure what the process USED to be called… woodcut, engraved… or how the used to do it…but I figure it must take an awful lot of time to do that by hand (drawing, engraving, or woodcutting) and it’s probably extremely costly to get someone to do it by hand these days as well. And I don’t think they actually do things like "paste-up" & "airbrushing" etc. anymore thanks to computers, desktop publishing and things like Photoshop etc. So I kinda figured that in these modern, photoshopped, cost effective, time conservative days… there must be a faster, cheaper process to achieve that effect.
Only my thoughts and opinion.
But then again… wuddo I know… yanno…?

Check out:
http://www.npg.si.edu/exh/journal/object.htm

Jeff ‘The Wizard of Draws’ Bucchino

Cartoons with a Touch of Magic
http://www.wizardofdraws.com

More Cartoons with a Touch of Magic
http://www.cartoonclipart.com
TM
The Magician
Oct 14, 2006
On Fri, 13 Oct 2006 22:44:35 -0400, Wizard of Draws
wrote:

On 10/13/06 12:23 AM, in article ,
"The Magician" wrote:

On Thu, 12 Oct 2006 21:37:56 -0400, Wizard of Draws
wrote:

On 10/12/06 7:50 PM, in article ,
"The Magician" wrote:

Been searching for some kind of Engraved/Woodcut effect like they do on faces in the New York Times.
I was wondering what the actual process is that they use in the newspaper… and if it’s possible to achieve it using Photoshop. I tried a few filters by Andromeda, etc., but so far have not found a filter or a way to duplicate this effect exactly.
Any ideas…?
Here’s an example:
http://www.edimsum.net/archives/vagabond/vagabond031902.jpg
Thanks a bunch!
Da Magish

What you see in that picture tells you all you need to know. It’s done by hand and as far as I know, there’s no filter that will duplicate that effect. Probably never will be a filter that can do it with the same ‘feeling’ that a human is capable of.

Well truthfully, I’m not so sure about that.
I think the picture is actually a faked or trick photograph done for a "whimsical look"…
"The artist drawing an exact duplicate of herself on a mirror". It looks to me like she just posed for it, and someone monkeyed with the mirror reflection after the fact. I think it would be damn near impossible for the artist there to actually duplicate that frozen, EXACT mirror image perpective of herself… mainly because she’s looking at it from an entirely different angle than what we (the camera) is seeing. So HER perspective would look much different to US if she were drawing what SHE saw.
(I hope dat makes sense…)
And they do that very same look for EVERY headshot of article authors and key figures in the New York Times… EVERY single day. I’m not exactly sure what the process USED to be called… woodcut, engraved… or how the used to do it…but I figure it must take an awful lot of time to do that by hand (drawing, engraving, or woodcutting) and it’s probably extremely costly to get someone to do it by hand these days as well. And I don’t think they actually do things like "paste-up" & "airbrushing" etc. anymore thanks to computers, desktop publishing and things like Photoshop etc. So I kinda figured that in these modern, photoshopped, cost effective, time conservative days… there must be a faster, cheaper process to achieve that effect.
Only my thoughts and opinion.
But then again… wuddo I know… yanno…?

Check out:
http://www.npg.si.edu/exh/journal/object.htm

Wow. My hat’s off to you sir… your absolutely right.
Datz amazing work.
I woulda bet da farm on it being some sort of
mezzotint/engraved/etched or woodcut kinda process.
Kinda explains why some pictures done like that sometimes appeared slightly "off" on occaision, and looked drawn to me. It was truly a lesson learned for me.
Thanks.

There’s been a few "artisitic looks" that I’ve been trying to achieve via Photoshop, etc. And that was one of them… oh well. Back to da drawing board… LITERALLY I guess.

While I got your attention…
any ideas about the process of turning photos into "Lichtensein-type comicbook popart"?
After much searching, I could only find ONE tutorial really.

This one:
http://tutorialoutpost.com/view/4036

And no matter what I do… it just doesn’t come out exactly like it’s supposed to, and the way it comes out in that tutorial.
The coloring, halftoning and all are cake work…
but it’s the line art that just doesn’t work via that tute. The whole "Threshold thing" just doesn’t produce nice clean lineart as in the tutorial or like on the website below.

I’ve tried tracing it in Illustrator and Coreldraw, but it just doesn’t come out clean.
But there must be a fairly workable and 100% dependable way to do it, because this guy is making a decent buck out of doing it…

http://www.allpopart.com/samples_gallery.php

It actually look kinda like vector art.
I just can’t seem to figure out how it’s done.
Any thoughts…?

BTW, I love your work on your site.
Thanks again buddy!
da magish
WO
Wizard of Draws
Oct 15, 2006
On 10/14/06 12:42 AM, in article ,
"The Magician" wrote:

Check out:
http://www.npg.si.edu/exh/journal/object.htm

Wow. My hat’s off to you sir… your absolutely right.
Datz amazing work.
I woulda bet da farm on it being some sort of
mezzotint/engraved/etched or woodcut kinda process.
Kinda explains why some pictures done like that sometimes appeared slightly "off" on occaision, and looked drawn to me. It was truly a lesson learned for me.
Thanks.

There’s been a few "artisitic looks" that I’ve been trying to achieve via Photoshop, etc. And that was one of them… oh well. Back to da drawing board… LITERALLY I guess.

While I got your attention…
any ideas about the process of turning photos into "Lichtensein-type comicbook popart"?
After much searching, I could only find ONE tutorial really.
This one:
http://tutorialoutpost.com/view/4036

And no matter what I do… it just doesn’t come out exactly like it’s supposed to, and the way it comes out in that tutorial.
The coloring, halftoning and all are cake work…
but it’s the line art that just doesn’t work via that tute. The whole "Threshold thing" just doesn’t produce nice clean lineart as in the tutorial or like on the website below.

I’ve tried tracing it in Illustrator and Coreldraw, but it just doesn’t come out clean.
But there must be a fairly workable and 100% dependable way to do it, because this guy is making a decent buck out of doing it…
http://www.allpopart.com/samples_gallery.php

It actually look kinda like vector art.
I just can’t seem to figure out how it’s done.
Any thoughts…?

BTW, I love your work on your site.
Thanks again buddy!
da magish

Thank you for the kind words.

Unfortunately I haven’t looked into the Lichtenstein style to be able to point you in the direction of a good tutorial. The guy you point to looks like that style could be done in a number of different ways, as most digital stuff can. Auto-tracing photos is usually not very satisfactory unless you have a very hi-res photo, otherwise it’s a lot of hand work and patience. —
Jeff ‘The Wizard of Draws’ Bucchino

Cartoons with a Touch of Magic
http://www.wizardofdraws.com

More Cartoons with a Touch of Magic
http://www.cartoonclipart.com
K
Kate
Oct 15, 2006
"The Magician" wrote in message
Been searching for some kind of Engraved/Woodcut effect like they do on faces in the New York Times.
I was wondering what the actual process is that they use in the newspaper… and if it’s possible to achieve it using Photoshop. I tried a few filters by Andromeda, etc., but so far have not found a filter or a way to duplicate this effect exactly.
Any ideas…?
Here’s an example:
http://www.edimsum.net/archives/vagabond/vagabond031902.jpg
Thanks a bunch!
Da Magish

Well, I know it isn’t Photoshop, but I have an older version of Microsoft Photo Editor that has pretty darn good "graphic pen" filter. It may not be exactly what you are looking for, but is pretty darn close. The rest of the program is pretty much useless but I keep it for just this. Perhaps you can find a graphic pen filter that will do for this particular purpose.

I believe it came as part of my MS Office 2000 or 2002 suite.

Kate
K
KatWoman
Oct 16, 2006
"www.kevinkienlein.com" wrote in message
in art school we studied this technique, it is called pointillism… if that helps… kk

go back to school and ask your money back
pointillism is a COLOR technique involving dots of pure colors

http://www.artcyclopedia.com/history/pointillism.html
Pointillism is a form of painting in which tiny dots of primary-colors are used to generate secondary colors. It is an offshoot of Impressionism, and is usually categorized as a form of Post-Impressionism. It is very similar to Divisionism, except that where Divisionism is concerned with color theory, Pointillism is more focused on the specific style of brushwork used to apply the paint.

The term "Pointillism" was first used with respect to the work of Georges Seurat, and he is the artist most closely associated with the movement. The relatively few artists who worked in this style also included Paul Signac and Henri-Edmond Cross.

Pointillism is considered to have been an influence on Fauvism.

…..
Been searching for some kind of Engraved/Woodcut effect like they do on faces in the New York Times.
I was wondering what the actual process is that they use in the newspaper… and if it’s possible to achieve it using Photoshop. I tried a few filters by Andromeda, etc., but so far have not found a filter or a way to duplicate this effect exactly.
Any ideas…?
Here’s an example:
http://www.edimsum.net/archives/vagabond/vagabond031902.jpg
Thanks a bunch!
Da Magish

some one posted how to do that though a while back’
think they called it how to turn a photo to a drawing.
I agree with the poster who says it is a photo technique not a hand draw threshold?
glowing edges?
I forget

What you see in that picture tells you all you need to know. It’s done by hand and as far as I know, there’s no filter that will duplicate that effect. Probably never will be a filter that can do it with the same ‘feeling’ that a human is capable of.

Well truthfully, I’m not so sure about that.
I think the picture is actually a faked or trick photograph done for a "whimsical look"…
"The artist drawing an exact duplicate of herself on a mirror". It looks to me like she just posed for it, and someone monkeyed with the mirror reflection after the fact. I think it would be damn near impossible for the artist there to actually duplicate that frozen, EXACT mirror image perpective of herself… mainly because she’s looking at it from an entirely different angle than what we (the camera) is seeing. So HER perspective would look much different to US if she were drawing what SHE saw.
(I hope dat makes sense…)
And they do that very same look for EVERY headshot of article authors and key figures in the New York Times… EVERY single day. I’m not exactly sure what the process USED to be called… woodcut, engraved… or how the used to do it…but I figure it must take an awful lot of time to do that by hand (drawing, engraving, or woodcutting) and it’s probably extremely costly to get someone to do it by hand these days as well. And I don’t think they actually do things like "paste-up" & "airbrushing" etc. anymore thanks to computers, desktop publishing and things like Photoshop etc. So I kinda figured that in these modern, photoshopped, cost effective, time conservative days… there must be a faster, cheaper process to achieve that effect.
Only my thoughts and opinion.
But then again… wuddo I know… yanno…?

TM
The Magician
Oct 16, 2006
On Mon, 16 Oct 2006 13:48:50 -0400, "KatWoman" wrote:

some one posted how to do that though a while back’
think they called it how to turn a photo to a drawing.
I agree with the poster who says it is a photo technique not a hand draw threshold?
glowing edges?
I forget

Da "Wiz’ got it coveerd, bagged and tagged in another reply. But thanks for your input Kat.
Always like hearing from ya.

da magish

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