Print oversized images?? – Feature Request maybe??

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Posted By
shawnlyman
Jun 7, 2005
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1318
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16
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I have a large panoramic image that I would like to print on multiple sheets to tape together. Mostly to see if I think it would be worth to have printed professionally. I don’t see any support in CS2 for printing on multiple pages. Am I missing something? Or is this just not supported yet?

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shawnlyman
Jun 7, 2005
I already know that I can manually "slide" my very large image on a paper sized canvas and print each "snapshot" to get the desired printing process. Or I can buy a very expensive wide-format inkjet printer. But I was hoping CS2 had a way to just quickly and easily "span" my prints on several sheets to cut, align, and tape together. Am I just dreaming? Probably a feature request.
L
LenHewitt
Jun 8, 2005
No, No print tiling in Photoshop. Sorry.
R
RSD99
Jun 8, 2005
Qimage
http://www.ddisoftware.com/qimage/

wrote in message
I have a large panoramic image that I would like to print on multiple
sheets to tape together. Mostly to see if I think it would be worth to have printed professionally. I don’t see any support in CS2 for printing on multiple pages. Am I missing something? Or is this just not supported yet?
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shawnlyman
Jun 13, 2005
Yeah, I was afraid that there wasn’t any "tile printing" in photoshop.

So I guess this is now a feature request. To be able to have a large canvas and then be able to automatically print on smaller paper that the attached printer supports (ie 8.5×11) without any scaling. Interesting that even Excel can do this automatically. (I know it’s not graphics editing, but the concept is there.)

While I still think CS2 is just incredible, I am still shocked that several simple concepts are still not implimented. This printing of larger than normal paper, the opening of large dimensional JPEGs, etc.
CK
Christine_Krof_Shock
Jun 13, 2005
however, you can take it over to Illustrator and print a large tiled image from there…it can be difficult to get the tiles to line up exactly however….
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shawnlyman
Jun 13, 2005
I don’t have illustrator. And I have printed titled images before. As long as the tiles are printed with a 1/2" overlap, it’s easy to line them up with no white lines visible. It would be silly to print tiles without any overlap. It’s just that right now I have to print out tiles manually, still within photoshop, but manually. Would be nice if I could just print my oversized image to my home printer and click a checkbox for "tiled" printing and choose an overlay amount. Or better yet, choose how many pages to fill and it would figure out how much overlay on each print to get a perfect fill of pages.
CK
Christine_Krof_Shock
Jun 13, 2005
I cheated…solved the problem by buying an Epson 2200 and use roll paper…for $700.00 it solved tiling problems for me…(up to 12×40"
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shawnlyman
Jun 13, 2005
You had tiling problems? I don’t have any issues with tiling. I just think that Photoshop is advanced enough that it should include the ability to automatically tile. Hence the Feature Request.

$700 for occasional oversized printing, is not an option for me and is a poor excuse for Photoshop to not include this simple feature. Would super easy programming since paper size, margins, etc are easy to access, then it just takes the overall size and figures in overlap, etc. Might take more ram than normal with the temp buffer needed, but I bet that could be optimized as well. Otherwise it could at least be a scripted "action" at the very least.

When I wanted professional oversized prints, I have a print shop do them. That is more affordable than a $700 printer for the very few oversized prints I do.
CK
Christine_Krof_Shock
Jun 13, 2005
wasn’t really a problem, just most of our layouts are 11×17" and this was a great way to check for positioning problems, creep, binding problems etc.

I think printer drivers are part of the limitations with doing tiling..there are way too many printers out there and writing a driver that could ensure tiling to all of the different printers would probably be a nightmare…I’m sure you are getting down to hardware level programming here and it could be difficult for Adobe to code, or to code well for all of the different printers and drivers out there….

You can tile in Illustrator, however, you have to do some re-positioning depending on the printer you are using…this is what make me suspect that drivers get in the way of developing this feature….I know of people who have had trouble with Hot Door’s Mutipage feature and it all came down to the printer they were using
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shawnlyman
Jun 13, 2005
In photoshop, all I did was create a new canvas with the dpi I wanted (250 in this case) and a physical size of 8"x10.5" for fitting on 8.5"x11" paper. Then I took a flattened version of my huge picture and placed it in the canvas, started at one end. Printed, dragged the layer while keeping any overlap (so not a full drag) and printed again. Did this until I was done. Has absolutely nothing to do with the printer driver. They would not have to change or create any printer drivers.

They would simply do in a temp buffer, what I do manually. They would have 2 buffers. 1 with the whole oversized image. And the other that is a blank canvas based on the paper size of the attached printer. Then it just would do everything I did manually, and then it would just print to the printer like anything else. Completely seprate and indepentant of any and all printer drivers.

As long as photoshop can print to your printer now, it would also be able to print "tiles" to the same printer without different drivers. Would be silly to change the drivers unless you were trying to have a tiled printing solution for ALL programs installed on your computer. I only care about Photoshop doing tile printing. Which would only need Photoshop changes and no printer driver changes.

If my oversize images were only 11×17, I myself would just have them printed locally or just scale it down for review on 8.5×11 paper. But the oversize images are VERY oversized. Panoramics that are 6-12" high by 20-50" wide. I just did one that is 8" tall by 48" wide. Took Five 8.5×11" pages. Printed from Photoshop.

It’s so easy to do manually in Photoshop and was super easy to line up the overlapped prints. Which is why I was shocked that Photoshop didn’t have an automatic way to do it.
GH
Gernot_Hoffmann
Jun 13, 2005
Shanlyman,

make a PDF and print it for a test with reduced size
on your local printer.
Then let the PDF be printed by a large format printer.
This tiling & glueing isn’t professional.

Tiling is necessary for printing 10m x 10m or so.

Best regards –Gernotb Hoffmann
SL
Shawn_Lyman
Jun 13, 2005
Name is Shawn Lyman by the way. Anyways,

I don’t use glue and yes, it is true. Tiling is not professional. Which is why I said that I have a print shop do my non-tiled printing of oversized images. But this is still expensive to just do for playing around. I use my home printer and tape on the back side of my tiles and do this for review. Once I have decided that the oversize test print is worthy of an expensive quality print shop job, then I just put my PSD or TIFF on CD to give to them.

Doing a test print of an 8" tall by 48" wide image on a single 8.5" by 11" paper will result in a super thin and extremely pointless review print. This is the whole point of tiling in the first place. While I know Photoshop is a very professional product, not everyone that uses it also owns expensive oversize printers. And with printing tiles being so easy to do manually in Photoshop, I see no excuse to not have that as a Feature Request.
MD
Michael_D_Sullivan
Jun 13, 2005
If you want to tile, check out your printer driver to see if it’s an option built into it. The driver for my Epson 2200 driver has a "poster printing" option on the page layout tab that lets you tile up to 4×4.
SL
Shawn_Lyman
Jun 14, 2005
Yes, some printer drivers have options like that. Mine does not. (and even if it did, that is not the point of my post)

Seems people keep trying to come up with non-Photoshop solutions. I am already able to do this in Photoshop. I am only Requesting a Feature of having this feature as part of Photoshop either as a function in the next release, or a plugin, or a script/action.

I really don’t need any more non-Photoshop solution ideas. If you have any other ways to do tile printing from within Photoshop other than the one I already use, I would love to hear it.
AC
Art Campbell
Jun 14, 2005
If you’d rather not buy a printer that supports roll paper…

Take your file to a Kinko’s or similar quick print shop and run it out on their printer.

Art
SL
Shawn_Lyman
Jun 14, 2005
Please people. Use the "show all messages" feature of this Adobe system and at least read all of my (origianl poster) messages. I have already mentioned that I use a professional print shop for all my oversized prints, but that at home I use tiled printing for cheap reviewing only. Once I have reviewed an oversized image at it’s actual printed size, even though tiled, I then decide if it’s worthy of professional printing that cost much more.

Even if I had an expensive "roll paper" wide format printer of my own, I would still do my ultra cheap home tile printing for initial review before printing in on a nice Wide Format printer.

On another note, I really hate this Adobe forum setup. Having it automatically hiding most of a thread causes people to not read most of what has already been said. Some people probably don’t even know that messages are being hidden and so they never read the full thread.

I wish Adobe would use a better forum application. But that is a way different topic.

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Give your photos a professional finish with sharpening in Photoshop. Learn to enhance details, create contrast, and prepare your images for print, web, and social media.

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