Trouble handling palettes

J
Posted By
Jethro
Jan 26, 2007
Views
444
Replies
8
Status
Closed
I am having a devil of a time trying to re-locate palettes. I want to re-arrange them and even lock one onto the bottom of another. I read how I am supposed to be able to move (drag) one palette to the bottom edge of another, release the mouse, and thereby lock the two palettes together. Supposedly as I do this, I should see the bottom edge of the target palette highlight, signaling the lock. I don’t see this. Any ideas why? Or should I say why not? Is there a preference (option) somewhere affecting this?

Thanks

Jethro

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R
ronviers
Jan 26, 2007
On Jan 26, 8:26 am, Jethro wrote:
I am having a devil of a time trying to re-locate palettes. I want to re-arrange them and even lock one onto the bottom of another. I read how I am supposed to be able to move (drag) one palette to the bottom edge of another, release the mouse, and thereby lock the two palettes together. Supposedly as I do this, I should see the bottom edge of the target palette highlight, signaling the lock. I don’t see this. Any ideas why? Or should I say why not? Is there a preference (option) somewhere affecting this?

Thanks

Jethro

That’s the way it works in Illustrator but not Photoshop. Dock refers to having the palettes distributed across the top in the Palette Well of either the control bar or of detached palettes. I think there are more advanced palette handling capabilities coming in CS3. Most experts use a separate monitor for palettes. I would like to do that some day.

Good luck,
Ron
E
edjh
Jan 26, 2007
Jethro wrote:
I am having a devil of a time trying to re-locate palettes. I want to re-arrange them and even lock one onto the bottom of another. I read how I am supposed to be able to move (drag) one palette to the bottom edge of another, release the mouse, and thereby lock the two palettes together. Supposedly as I do this, I should see the bottom edge of the target palette highlight, signaling the lock. I don’t see this. Any ideas why? Or should I say why not? Is there a preference (option) somewhere affecting this?

Thanks

Jethro
It’s a pain, but once you get the hang it’s fairly easy.

Pull one palette (not combined) by the tab and when you are there you will see a double line highlight on the target palette’s bottom line. If you are not careful you will just add it to the tabs on that palette.

Adobe could have made this easier.

Comic book sketches and artwork:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/edjh.html
Comics art for sale:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/batsale.html
E
edjh
Jan 26, 2007
edjh wrote:
Jethro wrote:
I am having a devil of a time trying to re-locate palettes. I want to re-arrange them and even lock one onto the bottom of another. I read how I am supposed to be able to move (drag) one palette to the bottom edge of another, release the mouse, and thereby lock the two palettes together. Supposedly as I do this, I should see the bottom edge of the target palette highlight, signaling the lock. I don’t see this. Any ideas why? Or should I say why not? Is there a preference (option) somewhere affecting this?

Thanks

Jethro
It’s a pain, but once you get the hang it’s fairly easy.
Pull one palette (not combined) by the tab and when you are there you will see a double line highlight on the target palette’s bottom line. If you are not careful you will just add it to the tabs on that palette.
Adobe could have made this easier.

Oh yeah, once you have things set the way you want, save it as a Work Space. You will be happy you did, believe me.


Comic book sketches and artwork:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/edjh.html
Comics art for sale:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/batsale.html
J
Jethro
Jan 26, 2007
On 26 Jan 2007 06:44:05 -0800, ""
wrote:

On Jan 26, 8:26 am, Jethro wrote:
I am having a devil of a time trying to re-locate palettes. I want to re-arrange them and even lock one onto the bottom of another. I read how I am supposed to be able to move (drag) one palette to the bottom edge of another, release the mouse, and thereby lock the two palettes together. Supposedly as I do this, I should see the bottom edge of the target palette highlight, signaling the lock. I don’t see this. Any ideas why? Or should I say why not? Is there a preference (option) somewhere affecting this?

Thanks

Jethro

That’s the way it works in Illustrator but not Photoshop. Dock refers to having the palettes distributed across the top in the Palette Well of either the control bar or of detached palettes. I think there are more advanced palette handling capabilities coming in CS3. Most experts use a separate monitor for palettes. I would like to do that some day.
Good luck,
Ron

Really?

I thought Lee Bennett at this site was saying that I could do what I described.

http://www.atpm.com/13.01/photoshop.shtml

which said in part:

If reordering the tabs isn’t enough, there’s an often-overlooked palette organization feature that allows you to stack multiple palettes as one tall window. To do this, start by dragging a tab as if you were going to move it to another palette window. Normally, the entire border of the new window will highlight in black to tell you that’s where you’re going to drop the tab. To instead attach it to the bottom, touch the mouse pointer to the bottom edge of the palette window, and you’ll see just the bottom highlight in black. When you release the mouse, the attachment is complete. You can then add more tabs to this new section of the overall palette window, or attach another tab beneath, making it even taller. Of course, you can also insert a tab between two attached palettes by touching the separator between them.

photoshop-docked-palettes

<snip>

In this image, I am preparing to attach a fourth palette beneath three that are already attached. Note the black highlight on the bottom of the Swatches palette that reveals I’m about to attach a new palette below. Remember, you must drag palette tabs—not the title bar above the tabs.

Dragging the title bar instead of the tabs simply moves the entire palette (or stack of palettes) elsewhere on your screen. You’ll note that the edges and corners of the window outline being dragged will visually snap to other palette windows, the purpose being to help precisely align the windows to taste. You’ll also find that the Tool palette can snap to the other palette windows. Since it does not have a tab, it is not possible to combine it with other palette tabs in a window, nor attach it to the bottom of window.

But then – this does not make it so.

Thanks

Jethro
E
edjh
Jan 26, 2007
/snip/
Jethro
That’s the way it works in Illustrator but not Photoshop. Dock refers to having the palettes distributed across the top in the Palette Well of either the control bar or of detached palettes. I think there are more advanced palette handling capabilities coming in CS3. Most experts use a separate monitor for palettes. I would like to do that some day.
Good luck,
Ron

Really?

I thought Lee Bennett at this site was saying that I could do what I described.

http://www.atpm.com/13.01/photoshop.shtml

Yes, you can.

which said in part:

If reordering the tabs isn’t enough, there’s an often-overlooked palette organization feature that allows you to stack multiple palettes as one tall window. To do this, start by dragging a tab as if you were going to move it to another palette window. Normally, the entire border of the new window will highlight in black to tell you that’s where you’re going to drop the tab. To instead attach it to the bottom, touch the mouse pointer to the bottom edge of the palette window, and you’ll see just the bottom highlight in black. When you release the mouse, the attachment is complete. You can then add more tabs to this new section of the overall palette window, or attach another tab beneath, making it even taller. Of course, you can also insert a tab between two attached palettes by touching the separator between them.

photoshop-docked-palettes
/snip/
Jethro


Comic book sketches and artwork:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/edjh.html
Comics art for sale:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/batsale.html
K
KatWoman
Jan 26, 2007
"edjh" wrote in message
edjh wrote:
Jethro wrote:
I am having a devil of a time trying to re-locate palettes. I want to re-arrange them and even lock one onto the bottom of another. I read how I am supposed to be able to move (drag) one palette to the bottom edge of another, release the mouse, and thereby lock the two palettes together. Supposedly as I do this, I should see the bottom edge of the target palette highlight, signaling the lock. I don’t see this. Any ideas why? Or should I say why not? Is there a preference (option) somewhere affecting this?

Thanks

Jethro
It’s a pain, but once you get the hang it’s fairly easy.
Pull one palette (not combined) by the tab and when you are there you will see a double line highlight on the target palette’s bottom line. If you are not careful you will just add it to the tabs on that palette.
Adobe could have made this easier.

Oh yeah, once you have things set the way you want, save it as a Work Space. You will be happy you did, believe me.

I love that feature

my new monitor swivels to vertical
I need to re-place the palettes each time
the "save my workspace" is the BOMB!!!
I keep a couple diff palettes open depending on my task
R
ronviers
Jan 26, 2007
On Jan 26, 10:42 am, edjh wrote:
/snip/

Jethro
That’s the way it works in Illustrator but not Photoshop. Dock refers to having the palettes distributed across the top in the Palette Well of either the control bar or of detached palettes. I think there are more advanced palette handling capabilities coming in CS3. Most experts use a separate monitor for palettes. I would like to do that some day.

Good luck,
Ron

Really?

I thought Lee Bennett at this site was saying that I could do what I described.

http://www.atpm.com/13.01/photoshop.shtmlYes, you can.

which said in part:

If reordering the tabs isn’t enough, there’s an often-overlooked palette organization feature that allows you to stack multiple palettes as one tall window. To do this, start by dragging a tab as if you were going to move it to another palette window. Normally, the entire border of the new window will highlight in black to tell you that’s where you’re going to drop the tab. To instead attach it to the bottom, touch the mouse pointer to the bottom edge of the palette window, and you’ll see just the bottom highlight in black. When you release the mouse, the attachment is complete. You can then add more tabs to this new section of the overall palette window, or attach another tab beneath, making it even taller. Of course, you can also insert a tab between two attached palettes by touching the separator between them.

photoshop-docked-palettes

/snip/

Jethro–
Comic book sketches and artwork:http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/edjh.html Comics art for sale:http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/batsale.html

I should have known – I will be more careful.
Sorry about that,
Ron
N
noone
Jan 27, 2007
In article ,
says…
On Jan 26, 8:26 am, Jethro wrote:
I am having a devil of a time trying to re-locate palettes. I want to re-arrange them and even lock one onto the bottom of another. I read how I am supposed to be able to move (drag) one palette to the bottom edge of another, release the mouse, and thereby lock the two palettes together. Supposedly as I do this, I should see the bottom edge of the target palette highlight, signaling the lock. I don’t see this. Any ideas why? Or should I say why not? Is there a preference (option) somewhere affecting this?

Thanks

Jethro

That’s the way it works in Illustrator but not Photoshop. Dock refers to having the palettes distributed across the top in the Palette Well of either the control bar or of detached palettes. I think there are more advanced palette handling capabilities coming in CS3. Most experts use a separate monitor for palettes. I would like to do that some day.
Good luck,
Ron

My guess (haven’t looked at the beta yet, so I could be very wrong) is that the palettes in CS3 will possibly behave like those in Production Studio, where there are a ton of real "docking" possibilities. For now, Ron is correct.

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