PIM enabled printing

SO
Posted By
Stephen_Osterday
May 28, 2004
Views
101
Replies
5
Status
Closed
I have an Epson printer that supports Print Image Matching (PIM). I have followed the instructions for importing and printing PIM enabled images in Photo Elements (2.0). Sadly, the resulting prints are totally unusable. The shadow areas look like a leopard’s spotted body. I did disable all color management in the printer driver as instructed in the instructions. Used only the color management in PS Elements and the correct ICC profile.

Why are my prints coming out so badly?

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NS
Nancy_S
May 29, 2004
Stephen,

I don’t specifically know how the Epson PIM thing works, but… did you begin by calibrating your monitor using the provided Adobe Gamma Utility in the Control Panel (for Windows and a CRT anyway)?
SO
Stephen_Osterday
May 29, 2004
No I didn’t because I only have Elements, I don’t plan to do any editing, and I just judge the output. The "Print Image Matching" is similar to Exif data and is used for the same purpose. That of reading the parameters recorded when the picture was taken and use those to make the print accurate.
NS
Nancy_S
May 29, 2004
Stephen,

So, maybe you need the ‘Ignore Exif’ plugin which you can download from Adobe?, I don’t know…perhaps the Epson website will prove invaluable for pointing you in the right direction.

I think calibrating one’s monitor is a must-do, myself. Some standardization is needed to view images as they were intended to display. You might compliment a family member on their terrific new peagreen sailboat and later discover that in fact the boat is an electrifying shade or vibrant green…:)

Seems to me though that there are occassions when your printout would benefit from doing some editing in PSE, Elements is an image editor…your camera may have been fooled by high contrast lighting, a low light situation may have produced a drab, tonal-range challenged image or any number of conditions where the final product is improved after some manipulation in PSE (just my 2 cents worth :))
SO
Stephen_Osterday
May 29, 2004
Nancy,

Thanks for your ideas. I’m sure as you say, many of my photos could be improved in PSE. However, graphic arts or anything remotely related to art is NOT MY cup of tea. I struggle just to get beyond "snap shots" with my photography.

I read about the ‘Ignore Exif’ plugin on the Adobe site. That may be worth trying – thanks.

–Steve
SO
Stephen_Osterday
May 29, 2004
I down loaded the Ignore Exif utility. It wouldn’t load because it is written for another version of Windows using Regedit4. So I manually inserted it into the registry. It doesn’t seem to do anything though. I still get the same bad prints. I guess I’m back to Qimage using the printer driver to do the color management. I even tried loading the same ICC profile in Qimage, but got basically the same results – bad. Oh well, I tried giving PSE a chance.

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