The correct procedure for making a brochure

RS
Posted By
Reza_Saheban
Jun 23, 2004
Views
292
Replies
21
Status
Closed
Hi.
I’m searching for the best way to make a brochure. Please see if my way is the best and share your print experience with me.
I think a vector environment is the best. First I make my material in FH (Freehand) (or Illustrator or Corel) then if I need any picture or effect I make it in PS (Photoshop) and save it as TIF and import that TIF into FH (or other vector applications) and finally give that FH (or Illustrator or Corel) to Lithographer.
1. Is it the best choice?
2. When I save something from PS as TIF, where can I change dpi? Which dpi is best? 300,600 or …
3. When I print something made in PS like text because the output of PS is not Vector the text doesn’t appear as smooth as what we can have in FH, therefore I think we should make all the text and material in FH (Illustrator or Corel) unless we need some sort of effect that FH (etc) can’t give use, then we have to use PS but we know that the TIF output wont be as good as FH. Am I right?

Regards
Reza Saheban

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SW
Scott_Weichert
Jun 23, 2004
The best tool to use would be a layout application like Indesign or QuarkXpress. Create raster images in Photoshop, vector content in Illustrator and put it all together with text in Indesign.

Raster images should be 300ppi or 1.5 times your output line screen.

Tiff output at 300ppi should be as good as Freehand output, just not as scalable.

There are many variables that depend upon exactly what you are creating.

I certainly would not create a brochure in Photoshop.
G
graffiti
Jun 23, 2004
The best tool to use would be a layout application like Indesign or QuarkXpress

Agree on the "best tool" statement but Freehand will certainly do the job.

Sounds like Reza has a basic workflow down ok to me.
F
fotografica
Jun 23, 2004
Based on my experience I suggest Indesign or Quark.
Images at 300dpi edited with PS and saved as TIF.

I suggest you check with your printer, they will provide you with valuable information as to what type of files the are more comfortable working with, get their profile settings.
Are you printing to web or sheetfed? There is a difference.

Ana
P
progress
Jun 23, 2004
to reiterate

Page layout app like Quark, Indesign, Pagemaker for layout and design, type etc. Indesign has advantages over Quark in that it can handle native PS files, allowing easier effects inside Indesign that would require more work in PS if Quark was the target app.

Vector app like Illustrator, Freehand for vector elements like custom type, line art illustrations etc.

PS for photo images…300dpi is safe at print size for most things…TIFF or EPS or even JPEG for file output.

Sounds like the CS suite would suit the bill, as long as your repro house and or clients can handle indesign files.
PH
Paul_Hokanson
Jun 23, 2004
Just to add to the good advice by all…

Sounds like the CS suite would suit the bill, as long as your repro house and or clients can handle indesign files.

Save as PDF (with proper export settings) from Indesign. Most presses are compatible with PDF, especially for a brochure. If text and layout is done in Freehand or AI, save as PDF (or eps if need be).
KN
Ken_Nielsen
Jun 23, 2004
Start with a dummy.
AW
Allen_Wicks
Jun 23, 2004
I Always start with a dummy…

<g>
C
CLS
Jun 23, 2004
Make a dummy.
Like Ken said.
(:
AS
Ann_Shelbourne
Jun 23, 2004
The value of using a InDesign, rather than Illustrator, for the creation of a brochure is that InD is designed to produce a multi-page document and illustrator is not.
P
progress
Jun 24, 2004
and its a damn sight faster for it.
RS
Reza_Saheban
Jun 24, 2004
If I want to put my vector work from FH or Illustrator into InDesign ,Should I copy and paste it from vector application(FH,AI) into InDesign anthing else ?! (Can I import *.FH11 or illustrator main format into InDesign?
B
Buko
Jun 24, 2004
Reza, It is best to place your artwork.
RS
Reza_Saheban
Jun 24, 2004
Sorry,but what do you mean by "place"?
L
LRK
Jun 24, 2004
Reza,

Place is under the File Menu at the top.

Sounds to me like you need to learn the basics of your software programs. There is a simple tutorial under the InDesign and Illustrator Help Menu to help you get an overview of the program.
RS
Reza_Saheban
Jun 24, 2004
Thank you. You are right. This is the first time I want to work with InDesign. Before I always used FH & PS but not InDesign.
L
LRK
Jun 24, 2004
You’re welcome. I have the same problem when I attempt to use Freehand… so I totally understand. 🙂
C
CouponBoy
Jun 24, 2004
Reza, go to art school first. No better yet, hire a qualified graphic designer.
JS
Jeffrey_Smith
Jun 24, 2004
So CouponBoy, maybe you can tell us how a qualified graphic designer who went to art school puts together Clipper Magazine…
L
Larryr544
Jun 24, 2004
I have built many brochures in PS but I agree it’s not the optimal tool.
P
Phosphor
Jun 24, 2004
Don’t know if you’re just spoofing, or being serious, Jeffrey, but Clipper Magazine is pretty well done…for the most part.

It was started right here in Lancaster PA at F&M College by a couple students. It has grown to be a huge succcess, appearing in almost 350 markets.

Still, when it arrives in MY mailbox, the first thing I do, before looking for bargains, is to look for stupid mistakes. I get to point and laugh, making fun of bad EPS files and font overpopulation.

It’s my duty, because they didn’t hire me way back when!

🙂
J
jonf
Jun 25, 2004
There are a whole lot of reasons for using a page layout app like Indesign or Quark, more than just the ability to create multiple pages. If you’re just doing one brochure, use whatever you have. If you’re trying to find out the best way to create brochures in general because you want to make a living at it, use the tools for what they’re intended. You’ll save yourself, your clients, and your press people a whole lot of headaches in the long run.

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