The correct procedure for making a brochure

RS
Posted By
Reza_Saheban
Jun 23, 2004
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695
Replies
21
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Closed
The correct procedure for making a brochure

Hi.
I’m searching for the best way to make a brochure. Please see if my way is the best and share your print experience with me.
I think a vector environment is the best. First I make my material in FH (Freehand) (or Illustrator or Corel) then if I need any picture or effect I make it in PS (Photoshop) and save it as TIF and import that TIF into FH (or other vector applications) and finally give that FH (or Illustrator or Corel) to Lithographer.
1. Is it the best choice?
2. When I save something from PS as TIF, where can I change dpi? Which dpi is best? 300,600 or …
3. When I print something made in PS like text because the output of PS is not Vector the text doesn’t appear as smooth as what we can have in FH, therefore I think we should make all the text and material in FH (Illustrator or Corel) unless we need some sort of effect that FH (etc) can’t give use, then we have to use PS but we know that the TIF output wont be as good as FH. Am I right?

Regards
Reza Saheban

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L
LenHewitt
Jun 23, 2004
Answered your same post in Illustrator_Win
RS
Reza_Saheban
Jun 24, 2004
Thanks for the reply.
1. If I want to put my vector work from FH or Illustrator into InDesign, Should I copy and paste it from vector application (FH, AI) into InDesign or anything else ?! (Can I import *.FH11 or illustrator main format into InDesign?
2. For importing a TIF made in PS, If I make a new picture from scratch, when I open a document I enter 600 for Pixels/inch, is that correct generally for print media?
3. And If I have a picture with low dpi, resample it as 600 Pixels/inch (In PS: image> image size and change resolution from anything low to 600,is that correct?
4. There are 3 kinds of "resample" which one is ok? (at the end I’ll save it as TIF for FH)
L
LenHewitt
Jun 24, 2004
Reza,

1. No. You can PLACE Illustrator .AI files or FH EPS files into InDesign. You should never copy/paste between applications.

2. No. 600 ppi is way overkill! 240 ppi should be fine for the vast majority of offset printing

3. No. As above but expect terrible quality due to re-sampling!

4. Bi-Cubic generally gives the best results except for screen-shots where nearest neighbour is more appropriate
B
BobLevine
Jun 24, 2004
1. No. You can PLACE Illustrator .AI files or FH EPS files into InDesign.
You should never copy/paste between applications.

Actually copy/paste from Illy and Freehand to ID works wonderfully. With AICB clipboard format you get fully editable objects in ID.

However c/p from Photoshop is terrible.

Bob
RS
Ross_Sabes
Jun 25, 2004
I create entire brochures in PS without any problem… If you print to a pdf your text will be just as sharp as if you did your text in Illustrator.
MM
Mac_McDougald
Jun 25, 2004
Yep.
Text also retains vector properties printed directly from PS to postscript printer, also.

M
B
BobLevine
Jun 25, 2004
No need to print to PDF. Photoshop can save PDFs natively.

Bob
HK
Harron_K._Appleman
Jun 25, 2004
I create entire brochures in PS without any problem…

All well and good amongst us friends, Ross. But if you’re ever applying for a prepress-related job, a word of advice: Never admit you create entire brochures in PS.

=-= Harron =-=
RS
Ross_Sabes
Jun 25, 2004
if you’re ever applying for a prepress-related job, a word of advice: Never admit you create entire brochures in PS.

No need to apply for pre-press job, I have a job as a graphic designer and never had any problems dealing with pre-press when I provide camera ready artwork for them.. In fact I have recieved many compliments from them about the way my work is prepared. I find PDF the best way to go. Once in PDF format who care whether it came out of Illustrator, Quark, Freehand, In Design or God forbid… PHOTOSHOP… Oh my!
RS
Ross_Sabes
Jun 25, 2004
No need to print to PDF. Photoshop can save PDFs natively

I prefer printing through the distiller.
HK
Harron_K._Appleman
Jun 25, 2004
We’re all very happy for you, Ross.
RS
Ross_Sabes
Jun 25, 2004
=-= Harron =-= , since you seem to be so wise in the ways of pre-press, please enlighten me on the limitations presented with creating a simple brochure in photoshop and distiller?
HK
Harron_K._Appleman
Jun 25, 2004
A "simple" brochure? Can you be more specific?

Look, Ross, I have no doubt about your ability to create an entire brochure in Photoshop.

I also have no doubt about my ability or that of many contributors here to create an entire brochure in Photoshop.

The original poster asks about the "best way" to make a brochure. Clearly, there is no single answer. Your answer is, presumably, "do it all in Photoshop." Others here are obliged to offer different points of view.

Peace, brother.

=-= Harron =-=
RS
Ross_Sabes
Jun 25, 2004
I am sorry if you misunderstood. I did not mean to imply that the "best way" is to do it all in photoshop, I was merely making the point that when going from photoshop to pdf your text will be just as sharp as text in FH of AI. Referring to the posters 3rd point.

The best way to make a brochure is to use the tools that will accomplish the desired end result. It is the final printed design that is important, not whether you used 4 different apps to create it or not.

By a simple brochure I mean a 4/4 tri-fold rack brochure. Hell throw in a spot color or 2 if you want. That can easily be accomplished without using 4 different applications.

BTW this is a Photoshop forum so I though it might be relavant to mention it can be and is done by pros without any problems. Your comments imply it cannot and should not. So please tell me, why is this?
HK
Harron_K._Appleman
Jun 25, 2004
Your comments imply it cannot and should not.

Which comments, specifically, Ross?
RS
Ross_Sabes
Jun 25, 2004
a word of advice: Never admit you create entire brochures in PS.
HK
Harron_K._Appleman
Jun 25, 2004
The entire quotation in context:

…if you’re ever applying for a prepress-related job, a word of advice: Never admit you create entire brochures in PS.

How does that imply entire brochures cannot be created in PS?

I stand by my advice. If you never have to apply for a prepress-related job ever again, you can ignore my advice. Or, if the job requirements specify "we want someone who can do everything in Photoshop," you can ignore my advice. Or, if you want to on general principle, you can ignore my advice.

I believe in using the best tool available for every job. Your belief — that it is unnecessary to use so many tools for certain jobs — is equally valid. Your beliefs are not more valid because your output service provider compliments you on your file preparation.

You wrote…

It is the final printed design that is important…

I agree 100 percent.

=-= Harron =-=
RS
Ross_Sabes
Jun 25, 2004
Ya, guess I’ll just ignore it. Thanks for the insight.
RS
Ross_Sabes
Jun 25, 2004
I stand by my advice. If you never have to apply for a prepress-related job ever again, you can ignore my advice. Or, if the job requirements specify "we want someone who can do everything in Photoshop," you can ignore my advice. Or, if you want to on general principle, you can ignore my advice.

I will ignore it because it is absolute nonsense.
HK
Harron_K._Appleman
Jun 25, 2004
Hey, look… Ross is kinda right, too.

Please don’t make me go to the lounge.
P
Phosphor
Jun 25, 2004
Photoshop’s cool and all, and a simple brochure certainly could be done using Photoshop alone.

Me, I prefer to have the better text-composing engine of InDesign.

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