Change Color of Brick Walls?

ET
Posted By
Evan_Thibeault
Aug 25, 2004
Views
3169
Replies
6
Status
Closed
Hello:

I’m looking for a tutorial to help me with a project, but can’t simplify my topic enough to allow an easy search.

Here’s my dilemna. I have a building facade composed of mottled brick and various ornamental details. I want to apply a color to it so the brick appears to have been painted with an opaque color, but I still need to allow all the shadow lines and details to show through.

How can this be done?

I have played with adjustment layers as well as blending modes but can’t seem to get things right. The best I can do is to have the building look like it is being viewed through a colored lense — no good.

Any help will be appreciated.

How to Improve Photoshop Performance

Learn how to optimize Photoshop for maximum speed, troubleshoot common issues, and keep your projects organized so that you can work faster than ever before!

Y
YrbkMgr
Aug 25, 2004
In photoshop it is said that there are at least three ways to do anything.

Pop an example of the picture up to a website and let us know the link. You’ll probably get a bevy of replies.

Peace,
Tony
Aug 25, 2004
Making accurate selections in Photoshop is 90% of the battle. If you’re able to isolate the parts of the façade you want to change, the rest will be pretty easy.

Still, I’m with Tony…Upload an decently-sized image if you have some server space and let us have a look at it.
GA
George_Austin
Aug 25, 2004
"…I have played with…blending modes…"

I believe you, but go back and play more with the "COLOR" blend mode. It was made to do exactly what you seek. It preserves the luminance of the bottom layer (and therefore the tonal variations)and the hue of the top layer.

So, select the brick area, hit CNTRL J to create a layer containing just the selection, Select that area on the new layer, fill the selection uniformly with the new color you want, switch that layer’s blend mode to COLOR, and adjust that layer’s opacity to suit yourself.

That ought to do a great job because, as I said, that is the job it was designed for.

George
ET
Evan_Thibeault
Aug 25, 2004
That sounds a lot like what I’m looking for, but there’s a catch. The tonal variations in the underlying layer come not only from mortar joints, offsets and the like but the fact that the brick is not uniform in color. It is old, used, formerly painted brick so varies widely in color.

I am trying to change it to a UNIFORM COLOR, yet "reveal" the other tonal differences related to the architectural details.

I know, likely an impossibility without a lot of tedious efforts.
Aug 25, 2004
As I’m sure you have discovered, as in Photoshop, just like in life itself, not everything has an easy solution.

STILL, I say, post a link to a full-screen-size image so we have a better idea of what you’re working with.
GA
George_Austin
Aug 25, 2004
"…The tonal variations in the underlying layer come not only from mortar joints, offsets and the like but the fact that the brick is not uniform in color…"

Luminance is not uniform between color channels. That is, the same color values give different luminances in diffferent channels. You will be surprised how varying hues will be picked up as tonal variations by the color blend mode. But, rather than discuss it ad nauseum, TRY it. I can’t tell from your response whether you had just dipped your toe in the pool or had taken the plunge. 🙂

George

Must-have mockup pack for every graphic designer 🔥🔥🔥

Easy-to-use drag-n-drop Photoshop scene creator with more than 2800 items.

Related Discussion Topics

Nice and short text about related topics in discussion sections