Re: Does any other program (windows or linux) do screenshot annotation efficiently?

O
Posted By
one
Apr 22, 2013
Views
803
Replies
4
Status
Closed
On Sun, 21 Apr 2013 17:13:04 +0100, Danny D. wrote
(in article <kl136g$79r$>):

Here is a WINDOWS example: (using Paint.NET)
http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12745022/img/12745022.gi f
Here is a LINUX example: (using Kolourpaint)
http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12745771/img/12745771.pn g
In summary, what is required for efficiency is:
a) arrowing (should be two clicks plus bending to avoid obstacles)
b) texting (should be a single click and then you start typing)
c) circling (should be as simple two clicks)

Personally I’d take a different approach, namely:

(a) paste each screenshot into a larger canvas

(b) use the empty margins for the textual annotations

(c) use straight lines, with or without arrowheads and boxes or circles, to link each annotation to the relevant sections of the screenshot.

Any general comments would go underneath the screenshot.

This should give a much clearer, cleaner presentation with no need for curved and over-under arrows or for putting text on the screenshot itself.

Just my thoughts as someone who, I confess, has only ever annotated screenshots very quickly and crudely. Feel free to curse me as a fool for not actually answering your questions.
D
danny
Apr 22, 2013
On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 17:00:27 +0100 one wrote:

Personally I’d take a different approach, namely:
No approach is wrong.

(a) paste each screenshot into a larger canvas
(b) use the empty margins for the textual annotations

This is a fine approach. In fact, my recent example on a.h.r (alt.home.repair) for cleaning toilet bowls with pool acid used a larger canvas, with a white background, just as you suggest: http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/12756361/img/12756361.pn g

(c) use straight lines, with or without arrowheads and boxes or circles, to link each annotation to the relevant sections of the screenshot.

Straight lines are fine; but sometimes a curved line will avoid obstacles and provide a more seamless integration. Any good screenshot editor will allow both – plus – Paint.NET allows dashed arrows, various arrowheads, double-headed arrows, etc.

Any general comments would go underneath the screenshot.

I agree it is especially useful to grow the canvas of the screenshot in order to edit below (or to the right). I had not mentioned this as a requirement simply because most photo editors already grow the canvas reasonably easily. For example, in Kolourpaint on Linux, you just grab the sides and expand, and the canvas automatically grows. You contract the canvas the same way. Very efficient.
D
danny
Apr 22, 2013
On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 16:50:47 +0000 Danny D. wrote:

I agree it is especially useful to grow the canvas of the screenshot in order to edit below (or to the right). I had not mentioned this as a requirement simply because most photo editors already grow the canvas reasonably easily. For example, in Kolourpaint on Linux, you just grab the sides and expand, and the canvas automatically grows. You contract the canvas the same way. Very efficient.

One point to make though, even though all programs can grow the canvas, is that it’s generally done in one of two ways.

1. You accurately specify the size & shape to grow (down to the pixel);
2. Or, you simply stretch & contract the canvass as needed.

Most freeware uses the first method, e.g., The GIMP, as shown below (which is instantly accurate, but time consuming since you often have to size & resize the canvas by trial and error): http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/12756530/img/12756530.pn g

However, I prefer the elegant simplicity of the second method, as shown below using KolourPaint on Linux:
http://www4.picturepush.com/photo/a/12756637/img/12756637.pn g

As always, the goal is to get the job done in the most efficient manner possible. Otherwise, you won’t bother with the screenshot.

You’ll notice, for example, VERY FEW people bother to screenshot what they doing. I do it all the time. Why? Because it’s so efficient for me – that it only takes a few seconds.

If everyone screenshotted like I do, the USENET would be even more useful than what it is today. All it takes is the right freeware.
O
one
Apr 24, 2013
On Mon, 22 Apr 2013 17:50:47 +0100, Danny D. wrote
(in article <kl3pp7$fn4$>):

(c) use straight lines, with or without arrowheads and boxes or circles, to link each annotation to the relevant sections of the screenshot.

Straight lines are fine; but sometimes a curved line will avoid obstacles and provide a more seamless integration. Any good

Obstacles can be avoided by using angles in straight lines.

However, my point here is to say that I don’t recall you mentioning TechSmith’s SnagIt for Mac and Windows as something you’ve tried out. I stumbled across it today and immediately thought of you.

SnagIt is not freeware (rather it’s 50-dollar-ware) but it has a 30-day demo which you might like to try out. As far as I can tell, it can’t do over-under arrows but it seems to meet all your other criteria with a certain panache. It also does video capture.

Have a look at the videos on SnagIt’s Mac page – these seems to have more of the software in action whereas the equivalent Win page mostly just shows people saying how good it is:

http://www.techsmith.com/snagit-mac-features.html
B
bugbear
Apr 25, 2013
Danny D. wrote:
One point to make though, even though all programs can grow the canvas, is that it’s generally done in one of two ways.
1. You accurately specify the size & shape to grow (down to the pixel);
2. Or, you simply stretch & contract the canvass as needed.

Most freeware uses the first method, e.g., The GIMP, as shown below

Gimp supports (1) (2), and (indeed) hybrid modes (2) constrained in various ways by (1).

BugBear

Powered by Creative Market

Related Discussion Topics

Nice and short text about related topics in discussion sections