How to replace warped text?

MB
Posted By
Mike B
Mar 19, 2005
Views
772
Replies
23
Status
Closed
Hi, I am having trouble with trying to replace the words in this logo:

http://www.silverfoxbar.com (the 30 seconds to mars logo)

This is going to be a tattoo and I want to replace the text in the outer ring
with my own latin. Can this be done in PS? Any help would be very appreciated. Thanks.

How to Improve Photoshop Performance

Learn how to optimize Photoshop for maximum speed, troubleshoot common issues, and keep your projects organized so that you can work faster than ever before!

B
bogus
Mar 19, 2005
You didn’t say what version of PS… so a qualified yes.

In CS you can use Warped Text. It is in under menubar to the right of the alignment options when you have text tool selected.

Mike B wrote:

Hi, I am having trouble with trying to replace the words in this logo:
http://www.silverfoxbar.com (the 30 seconds to mars logo)
This is going to be a tattoo and I want to replace the text in the outer ring
with my own latin. Can this be done in PS? Any help would be very appreciated. Thanks.

E
edjh
Mar 19, 2005
Mike B wrote:
Hi, I am having trouble with trying to replace the words in this logo:
http://www.silverfoxbar.com (the 30 seconds to mars logo)
This is going to be a tattoo and I want to replace the text in the outer ring
with my own latin. Can this be done in PS? Any help would be very appreciated. Thanks.
Is the text editable in the original file? Best done in Illustrator or Freehand. There are ways to do it in Photoshop, but not that easily.


Comic book sketches and artwork:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/edjh.html
Comics art for sale:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/batsale.html
T
Tacit
Mar 19, 2005
In <56W_d.28156$>, Mike B wrote:
This is going to be a tattoo and I want to replace the text in the outer ring with my own latin. Can this be done in PS?

With a lot of frustration and a lot of aggrevation and a lot of time, sure.

Photoshop is the wrong tool for this job. You really want to be using Illustrator instead. One-hour job in Photoshop, seven-second job in Illustrator.

Art, shareware, photography, polyamory, kink:
http://www.xeromag.com/franklin.html
B
Brian
Mar 19, 2005
edjh wrote:

Is the text editable in the original file? Best done in Illustrator or Freehand. There are ways to do it in Photoshop, but not that easily.

edjh also forgot to mention CorelDraw…..for some strange reason Adobe people hate Corel. In Corel you would draw a circle, type text directly onto it and delete the circle….job done!

Brian.
J
jjs
Mar 19, 2005
"Mike B" wrote in message
Hi, I am having trouble with trying to replace the words in this logo:
http://www.silverfoxbar.com (the 30 seconds to mars logo)
This is going to be a tattoo and I want to replace the text in the outer ring
with my own latin. Can this be done in PS?

Yes. The best way is to make the circular path and type on it. The warped-text option isn’t nearly as nice.
E
edjh
Mar 19, 2005
Brian wrote:
edjh wrote:

Is the text editable in the original file? Best done in Illustrator or Freehand. There are ways to do it in Photoshop, but not that easily.

edjh also forgot to mention CorelDraw…..for some strange reason Adobe people hate Corel. In Corel you would draw a circle, type text directly onto it and delete the circle….job done!

Brian.
I don’t hate CorelDraw. Just don’t use it. In my office we tested it and found it wanting for some reason I can’t remember. I am more used to Freehand but I do have Illustrator and a copy of CorelDraw (not installed).


Comic book sketches and artwork:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/edjh.html
Comics art for sale:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/batsale.html
I
iehsmith
Mar 19, 2005
Actually, my first question would be,
do you have permission to use the logo?

inez
B
Brian
Mar 19, 2005
edjh wrote:

Brian wrote:

edjh wrote:

Is the text editable in the original file? Best done in Illustrator or Freehand. There are ways to do it in Photoshop, but not that easily.

edjh also forgot to mention CorelDraw…..for some strange reason Adobe people hate Corel. In Corel you would draw a circle, type text directly onto it and delete the circle….job done!

Brian.
I don’t hate CorelDraw. Just don’t use it. In my office we tested it and found it wanting for some reason I can’t remember. I am more used to Freehand but I do have Illustrator and a copy of CorelDraw (not installed).
Hi edjh,

I have never used Freehand, but I would be very interested to know what it is like. I know it is a bit off topic here, but how would you compare it with Illustrator. Not a feature for feature comparison, just generally as a user (ease of use, speed of use, etc). I am always interested in looking at alternatives and what others feel works best.

Cheers,
Brian.
H
Hecate
Mar 20, 2005
On Sat, 19 Mar 2005 18:12:17 GMT, edjh wrote:

Brian wrote:
edjh wrote:

Is the text editable in the original file? Best done in Illustrator or Freehand. There are ways to do it in Photoshop, but not that easily.

edjh also forgot to mention CorelDraw…..for some strange reason Adobe people hate Corel. In Corel you would draw a circle, type text directly onto it and delete the circle….job done!

Brian.
I don’t hate CorelDraw. Just don’t use it. In my office we tested it and found it wanting for some reason I can’t remember. I am more used to Freehand but I do have Illustrator and a copy of CorelDraw (not installed).

CDraw – nice print preview, useless colour management. At least that’s what we found. It’s very usable when it doesn’t crash, but Corel don’t do colour management well. I use Painter a lot and for printing I export to Photoshop…



Hecate – The Real One

Fashion: Buying things you don’t need, with money
you don’t have, to impress people you don’t like…
H
Hecate
Mar 20, 2005
On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 06:34:58 +1100, Brian
wrote:

Hi edjh,

I have never used Freehand, but I would be very interested to know what it is like. I know it is a bit off topic here, but how would you compare it with Illustrator. Not a feature for feature comparison, just generally as a user (ease of use, speed of use, etc). I am always interested in looking at alternatives and what others feel works best.
Freehand is really nice. Generally better than Illustrator for a lot of things, weaker in others. Like Corel, Macromedia are fine with RGB, pretty useless with CMYK (i.e. print colour management).. I.e if you don’t need colour management, fine., If you do Adobe is the most sensible answer.



Hecate – The Real One

Fashion: Buying things you don’t need, with money
you don’t have, to impress people you don’t like…
E
edjh
Mar 20, 2005
Hecate wrote:
On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 06:34:58 +1100, Brian
wrote:

Hi edjh,

I have never used Freehand, but I would be very interested to know what it is like. I know it is a bit off topic here, but how would you compare it with Illustrator. Not a feature for feature comparison, just generally as a user (ease of use, speed of use, etc). I am always interested in looking at alternatives and what others feel works best.

Freehand is really nice. Generally better than Illustrator for a lot of things, weaker in others. Like Corel, Macromedia are fine with RGB, pretty useless with CMYK (i.e. print colour management).. I.e if you don’t need colour management, fine., If you do Adobe is the most sensible answer.



Hecate – The Real One

Fashion: Buying things you don’t need, with money
you don’t have, to impress people you don’t like…

We have no problem with CMYK in FH. The difference to me is that FH has the ability to do multi-page documents, which is nice, but essential is that you can save as a template.

By this I mean, we have a set of blank templates with color lists all named the same according to Cyan and Black breakdown. But the C nd K are different Pantone colors for each template. If you import a cyan/black illustration into the template it takes on the colors of the template. This is for designing/ visualization. The files are converted to cyan and black afterward for final output (where C will be one spot color on press and K another) Sounds odd, I know, but it works and I am pretty sure Illustrator can’t do this.

In the Mac environment FH 7 was near perfect. We upgraded to 10 which is buggy as hell. Then we switched to OS X and it was better but with a whole different set of bugs. I have MX on my Mac at work and we will all be getting it soon. It seems very like 7 was in OS 9 but with some nifty new features.

Sadly we don’t use Freehand very much any more. I miss it because it’s what I originally trained on(FH 5) and at one time I was quite good at it.


Comic book sketches and artwork:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/edjh.html
Comics art for sale:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/batsale.html
B
Brian
Mar 20, 2005
Hecate wrote:

On Sat, 19 Mar 2005 18:12:17 GMT, edjh wrote:

Brian wrote:

edjh wrote:

Is the text editable in the original file? Best done in Illustrator or Freehand. There are ways to do it in Photoshop, but not that easily.

edjh also forgot to mention CorelDraw…..for some strange reason Adobe people hate Corel. In Corel you would draw a circle, type text directly onto it and delete the circle….job done!

Brian.

I don’t hate CorelDraw. Just don’t use it. In my office we tested it and found it wanting for some reason I can’t remember. I am more used to Freehand but I do have Illustrator and a copy of CorelDraw (not installed).

CDraw – nice print preview, useless colour management. At least that’s what we found. It’s very usable when it doesn’t crash, but Corel don’t do colour management well. I use Painter a lot and for printing I export to Photoshop…



Hecate – The Real One

Fashion: Buying things you don’t need, with money
you don’t have, to impress people you don’t like…

Thanks for the comments guys, it all helps. I really like to broaden my knowledge across a lot of software. I have had no colour problems so far with what I use, but I generally print to my desktop photo printer and have had little experience with commercial printers.
I guess that is the area I most fear, but up and coming opportunities will force me to have to deal with commercial printers on a regular basis. I will probably ask you lots of questions Hecate when the time draws near. Hope you don’t mind.

Brian.
I
iehsmith
Mar 20, 2005
On 3/20/05 2:54 AM, Brian uttered:

I guess that is the area I most fear, but up and coming opportunities will force me to have to deal with commercial printers on a regular basis. I will probably ask you lots of questions Hecate when the time draws near. Hope you don’t mind.

Brian.

When you or your client picks a printer call and speak to prepress if you can, BEFORE you do anything. Generally they will the best source of info for that particular printer and their workflow.

inez
B
Brian
Mar 20, 2005
iehsmith wrote:

On 3/20/05 2:54 AM, Brian uttered:

I guess that is the area I most fear, but up and coming opportunities will force me to have to deal with commercial printers on a regular basis. I will probably ask you lots of questions Hecate when the time draws near. Hope you don’t mind.

Brian.

When you or your client picks a printer call and speak to prepress if you can, BEFORE you do anything. Generally they will the best source of info for that particular printer and their workflow.

inez
Hi inez,

thanks for that, that sounds like excellent advice. Logical too, funny how we forget to be logical at times.

Have a great day/night (wherever you may be),
Brian.
MB
Mike B
Mar 20, 2005
Photoshop is the wrong tool for this job. You really want to be using Illustrator instead. One-hour job in Photoshop, seven-second job in Illustrator.

Ok! Illustrator installed. Now can anyone show me how to do it 🙂 !! ?? 🙂

"Tacit" wrote in message
In <56W_d.28156$>, Mike B wrote:
This is going to be a tattoo and I want to replace the text in the outer ring with my own latin. Can this be done in PS?

With a lot of frustration and a lot of aggrevation and a lot of time, sure.

Photoshop is the wrong tool for this job. You really want to be using Illustrator instead. One-hour job in Photoshop, seven-second job in Illustrator.

Art, shareware, photography, polyamory, kink:
http://www.xeromag.com/franklin.html
T
Tacit
Mar 20, 2005
In article <Usc%d.29982$>,
"Mike B" wrote:

Ok! Illustrator installed. Now can anyone show me how to do it 🙂 !! ?? 🙂

To put text on a circle:

1. Draw a circle using the Ellipse tool. It does not matter if the circle has a fill or stroke on it; it will become invisible when you attach text to it.

2. Click your mouse on the Text tool and hold down the mouse button. Additional text tools will pop out…one of them being the Text on a Path tool. Choose the Text on a Path tool; it looks kind of like the letter T with a slanted line.

3. Click the Text on a Path tool on the circle; the text will be attached to the circle, and will follow the circle as you type. If you want, you can use the direct selection tool to pull the text to the inside or outside of the circle, or move it along the circle.


Art, photography, shareware, polyamory, kink, and more!
www.xeromag.com/franklin.html
T
Tacit
Mar 20, 2005
In article ,
Brian wrote:

I have never used Freehand, but I would be very interested to know what it is like. I know it is a bit off topic here, but how would you compare it with Illustrator. Not a feature for feature comparison, just generally as a user (ease of use, speed of use, etc). I am always interested in looking at alternatives and what others feel works best.

I have used Freehand since version 2.0 and Illustrator since Illustrator 88. I’ve used both applications, up to and including the current versions (Freehand MX and Illustrator CS), in aprofessional production environment.

I don’t like Freehand, and find Illustrator much easier to use. In my experience, Freehand has many weaknesses when compared to Illustrator, including:

-A much less intuitive inspector. It is not possible to look at an object in Freehand just by clicking on it and see at a glance if the fill is spot color or process color, particularly if the color is part of a gradient.

– Freehand has many effects such as drop shadow effects which look great on the screen, and print to a consumer inkjet printer fine,but don’t work in a prepress environment. Freehand renders these effects internally as raster RGB effects, and outputs them as raster CMY rather than CMYK; what that means in English is that nice, beautiful, soft drop shadow that looks so gorgeous on your screen looks like crap in print.

– Freehand’s vector masking is quite primitive and crude compared to Illustrator’s. In Illustrator, you mask an object by drawing the mask, clicking on the object and the mask, and choosing Create Mask from a menu. In Freehand, you draw the mask, click on the object you want to mask, cut it to the Clipboard, and paste it into the mask. If the object you’re masking happens to be, oh, say, a 48MB placed image, then be prepared for it to take a while, and of course you’ll lose whatever else was on the clipboard…

– Illustrator makes it easier to manipulate single points on a curve or single elements within a group than Freehand; it’s slightly clumsier in Freehand.

– Illustrator has the Pathfinder, a beautiful suite of tools that will find the intersection or difference of two vector objects, divide a group of objects, punch one object out of another, and do similar tasks. Freehand’s suite of tools for manipulating overlapping vector objects is much less extensive and not as sophisticated.

I’m also a lot less fond of Freehand’s user interface in general, even though until Illustrator 8 I used Freehand more often and for more complex projects. This complaint extends beyond Freehand; I find that other Macromedia apps, such as Director and Dreamweaver, have similar awkwardnesses in their user interface.


Art, photography, shareware, polyamory, kink, and more!
www.xeromag.com/franklin.html
H
Hecate
Mar 21, 2005
On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 18:54:36 +1100, Brian
wrote:

Thanks for the comments guys, it all helps. I really like to broaden my knowledge across a lot of software. I have had no colour problems so far with what I use, but I generally print to my desktop photo printer and have had little experience with commercial printers.
I guess that is the area I most fear, but up and coming opportunities will force me to have to deal with commercial printers on a regular basis. I will probably ask you lots of questions Hecate when the time draws near. Hope you don’t mind.
of course I wouldn’t mind. Occasionally you may not like the answers though 😉



Hecate – The Real One

Fashion: Buying things you don’t need, with money
you don’t have, to impress people you don’t like…
B
Brian
Mar 21, 2005
tacit wrote:

In article ,
Brian wrote:

I have never used Freehand, but I would be very interested to know what it is like. I know it is a bit off topic here, but how would you compare it with Illustrator. Not a feature for feature comparison, just generally as a user (ease of use, speed of use, etc). I am always interested in looking at alternatives and what others feel works best.

I have used Freehand since version 2.0 and Illustrator since Illustrator 88. I’ve used both applications, up to and including the current versions (Freehand MX and Illustrator CS), in aprofessional production environment.

I don’t like Freehand, and find Illustrator much easier to use. In my experience, Freehand has many weaknesses when compared to Illustrator, including:

-A much less intuitive inspector. It is not possible to look at an object in Freehand just by clicking on it and see at a glance if the fill is spot color or process color, particularly if the color is part of a gradient.

– Freehand has many effects such as drop shadow effects which look great on the screen, and print to a consumer inkjet printer fine,but don’t work in a prepress environment. Freehand renders these effects internally as raster RGB effects, and outputs them as raster CMY rather than CMYK; what that means in English is that nice, beautiful, soft drop shadow that looks so gorgeous on your screen looks like crap in print.
– Freehand’s vector masking is quite primitive and crude compared to Illustrator’s. In Illustrator, you mask an object by drawing the mask, clicking on the object and the mask, and choosing Create Mask from a menu. In Freehand, you draw the mask, click on the object you want to mask, cut it to the Clipboard, and paste it into the mask. If the object you’re masking happens to be, oh, say, a 48MB placed image, then be prepared for it to take a while, and of course you’ll lose whatever else was on the clipboard…

– Illustrator makes it easier to manipulate single points on a curve or single elements within a group than Freehand; it’s slightly clumsier in Freehand.

– Illustrator has the Pathfinder, a beautiful suite of tools that will find the intersection or difference of two vector objects, divide a group of objects, punch one object out of another, and do similar tasks. Freehand’s suite of tools for manipulating overlapping vector objects is much less extensive and not as sophisticated.

I’m also a lot less fond of Freehand’s user interface in general, even though until Illustrator 8 I used Freehand more often and for more complex projects. This complaint extends beyond Freehand; I find that other Macromedia apps, such as Director and Dreamweaver, have similar awkwardnesses in their user interface.
Hi Tacit,

Thank you very much for that detailed and ‘experienced’ response. That was very helpful.

Regards,
Brian.
B
Brian
Mar 21, 2005
Hecate wrote:

On Sun, 20 Mar 2005 18:54:36 +1100, Brian
wrote:

Thanks for the comments guys, it all helps. I really like to broaden my knowledge across a lot of software. I have had no colour problems so far with what I use, but I generally print to my desktop photo printer and have had little experience with commercial printers.
I guess that is the area I most fear, but up and coming opportunities will force me to have to deal with commercial printers on a regular basis. I will probably ask you lots of questions Hecate when the time draws near. Hope you don’t mind.

of course I wouldn’t mind. Occasionally you may not like the answers though 😉



Hecate – The Real One

Fashion: Buying things you don’t need, with money
you don’t have, to impress people you don’t like…
That’s ok Hecate, honesty is the best policy, LOL.

Brian.
E
edjh
Mar 21, 2005
tacit wrote:
In article ,
Brian wrote:

I have never used Freehand, but I would be very interested to know what it is like. I know it is a bit off topic here, but how would you compare it with Illustrator. Not a feature for feature comparison, just generally as a user (ease of use, speed of use, etc). I am always interested in looking at alternatives and what others feel works best.

I have used Freehand since version 2.0 and Illustrator since Illustrator 88. I’ve used both applications, up to and including the current versions (Freehand MX and Illustrator CS), in aprofessional production environment.

I don’t like Freehand, and find Illustrator much easier to use. In my experience, Freehand has many weaknesses when compared to Illustrator, including:

-A much less intuitive inspector. It is not possible to look at an object in Freehand just by clicking on it and see at a glance if the fill is spot color or process color, particularly if the color is part of a gradient.

– Freehand has many effects such as drop shadow effects which look great on the screen, and print to a consumer inkjet printer fine,but don’t work in a prepress environment. Freehand renders these effects internally as raster RGB effects, and outputs them as raster CMY rather than CMYK; what that means in English is that nice, beautiful, soft drop shadow that looks so gorgeous on your screen looks like crap in print.
– Freehand’s vector masking is quite primitive and crude compared to Illustrator’s. In Illustrator, you mask an object by drawing the mask, clicking on the object and the mask, and choosing Create Mask from a menu. In Freehand, you draw the mask, click on the object you want to mask, cut it to the Clipboard, and paste it into the mask. If the object you’re masking happens to be, oh, say, a 48MB placed image, then be prepared for it to take a while, and of course you’ll lose whatever else was on the clipboard…

– Illustrator makes it easier to manipulate single points on a curve or single elements within a group than Freehand; it’s slightly clumsier in Freehand.

– Illustrator has the Pathfinder, a beautiful suite of tools that will find the intersection or difference of two vector objects, divide a group of objects, punch one object out of another, and do similar tasks. Freehand’s suite of tools for manipulating overlapping vector objects is much less extensive and not as sophisticated.

I’m also a lot less fond of Freehand’s user interface in general, even though until Illustrator 8 I used Freehand more often and for more complex projects. This complaint extends beyond Freehand; I find that other Macromedia apps, such as Director and Dreamweaver, have similar awkwardnesses in their user interface.

Used to be able to use Illustrator Plugins in Freehand. I used Pathfinder tools all the time in FH7. But I am not sure if this is possible with FH 10 or MX. I know it doesn’t work with the older plugins in OS X. Never could get it to work in Windows.


Comic book sketches and artwork:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/edjh.html
Comics art for sale:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/batsale.html
MB
Mike B
Mar 21, 2005
Thank you!

"tacit" wrote in message
In article <Usc%d.29982$>,
"Mike B" wrote:

Ok! Illustrator installed. Now can anyone show me how to do it 🙂 !! ??
🙂
To put text on a circle:

1. Draw a circle using the Ellipse tool. It does not matter if the circle has a fill or stroke on it; it will become invisible when you attach text to it.

2. Click your mouse on the Text tool and hold down the mouse button. Additional text tools will pop out…one of them being the Text on a Path tool. Choose the Text on a Path tool; it looks kind of like the letter T with a slanted line.

3. Click the Text on a Path tool on the circle; the text will be attached to the circle, and will follow the circle as you type. If you want, you can use the direct selection tool to pull the text to the inside or outside of the circle, or move it along the circle.

Art, photography, shareware, polyamory, kink, and more!
www.xeromag.com/franklin.html
O
Odysseus
Mar 21, 2005
In article <fd5%d.166$>,
edjh wrote:

<snip>
In the Mac environment FH 7 was near perfect. We upgraded to 10 which is buggy as hell. Then we switched to OS X and it was better but with a whole different set of bugs. I have MX on my Mac at work and we will all be getting it soon. It seems very like 7 was in OS 9 but with some nifty new features.
I use Mac FH 8, which is very solid — and doesn’t have the rather useless (except for doing quick preliminary mock-ups) raster effects Tacit criticized. I’ve never liked Illustrator’s drawing tools, especially for things like joining one path to another; FH’s methods have always seemed more intuitive to me, and it has a single Pen tool that does just about everything. Another task I find very annoying in AI is selecting objects underneath others, requiring that one hide the upper ones, switch to a wireframe view, or use the Layers palette.

Since this is OT I’ll try to be brief in summarizing a few more of the respective strengths of AI and FH that stand out for me:

AI has a fairly powerful built-in PS interpreter; while FH can place and print EPSFs it can’t edit them.

AI’s Layer palette detailing objects as well as the layers themselves (like Corel’s Object Manager) can be very handy; FH’s shows layers only.

Recent versions of AI have far surpassed FH in handling OpenType and non-Latin fonts; to use e.g. Chinese type in FH I have to first format it in AI, convert the text to paths, and export it.

AI’s transparency features are quite strong; although it often has trouble printing its creations they can usually be output correctly by InDesign. As Tacit mentioned, FH’s are RGB-based and definitely not prepress-friendly.

I disagree with Tacit about the shape-manipulation features, though; for example AI can produce quite bizarre results when expanding strokes into closed shapes, while IME FH always produces what one would expect.

AI has only the artboard, while FH allows multiple pages of varying sizes — especially handy for stationery packages, and also for multiple versions or colour schemes, e.g. for corporate logos. While I wouldn’t recommend FH for book-work, which generally needs a dedicated page-layout program, it’s just fine for brochures and newsletters in the four- to sixteen-page range or so.

I’ve only rarely been able to get usable film output directly from AI, while until the most recent versions FH has generally been very reliable at printing.

FH has a powerful graphic search-and-replace function, much more versatile and useful than AI’s "Select Similar".

AI has historically been quite weak at handling spot colour in images; I believe it’s only the most recent versions that have allowed one to assign spot colour to a greyscale TIFF, for example, and it still has problems doing spot separations where transparency is involved.

I find FH generally more amenable to numerical, as opposed to visual, positioning and sizing, and for dealing with arithmetic and multiple units of measure in entry fields, but it lacks AI’s nine-point proxy.

I could probably go on for much longer, but that’s enough for now!


Odysseus

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