gamma driving me crazy

T
Posted By
Toby
Sep 23, 2004
Views
210
Replies
4
Status
Closed
Hi all,

I recently put together a new machine and installed my copy of Photoshop CS on it. This box has Win XP, my old one is running W2K. Setup is the same; the monitors are calibrated using a Spyder and not running Adobe Gamma.

On the old machine, the appearance of files opened in PS is quite similar to what is displayed using other graphics programs, including ACDSee, ThumbsUp , webviewing the uploaded files on Renderosity, and in the Epson print preview within PS.

On the XP machine files opened in PS appear much darker than with these other programs. It seems to affect only PS, whatever it is. It is disconcerting to see the difference in PS and in the Epson print preview box which opens in PS in the print dialog.

The gamma of the files seems quite similar in all situations between the two machines except for PS on the XP box.

There is no difference in my color management settings between the two machines (I keep the old one as backup), and for the life of me I can’t figure out what’s going on. At what point are gamma settings independent of monitor calibration in PS? I’ve been through the color management tab in PS and can’t seem to correct this problem there, but perhaps there is something hidden somewhere I have not tried.

Any suggestions would be appreciated…

TIA,

Toby

How to Improve Photoshop Performance

Learn how to optimize Photoshop for maximum speed, troubleshoot common issues, and keep your projects organized so that you can work faster than ever before!

MR
Mike Russell
Sep 23, 2004
Toby wrote:
Hi all,

I recently put together a new machine and installed my copy of Photoshop CS on it. This box has Win XP, my old one is running W2K. Setup is the same; the monitors are calibrated using a Spyder and not running Adobe Gamma.

On the old machine, the appearance of files opened in PS is quite similar to what is displayed using other graphics programs, including ACDSee, ThumbsUp , webviewing the uploaded files on Renderosity, and in the Epson print preview within PS.

On the XP machine files opened in PS appear much darker than with these other programs. It seems to affect only PS, whatever it is. It is disconcerting to see the difference in PS and in the Epson print preview box which opens in PS in the print dialog.

The gamma of the files seems quite similar in all situations between the two machines except for PS on the XP box.

There is no difference in my color management settings between the two machines (I keep the old one as backup), and for the life of me I can’t figure out what’s going on. At what point are gamma settings independent of monitor calibration in PS? I’ve been through the color management tab in PS and can’t seem to correct this problem there, but perhaps there is something hidden somewhere I have not tried.
Any suggestions would be appreciated…

Toby,

Try running Adobe Gamma, and open the Spyder’s display profile without making any mods to it. It’s like giving a hound dog a sniff of someone’s clothing to initiate the search.


Mike Russell
www.curvemeister.com
www.geigy.2y.net
H
Hecate
Sep 24, 2004
On 23 Sep 2004 12:19:07 -0500, "Toby" wrote:

Hi all,

I recently put together a new machine and installed my copy of Photoshop CS on it. This box has Win XP, my old one is running W2K. Setup is the same; the monitors are calibrated using a Spyder and not running Adobe Gamma.
On the old machine, the appearance of files opened in PS is quite similar to what is displayed using other graphics programs, including ACDSee, ThumbsUp , webviewing the uploaded files on Renderosity, and in the Epson print preview within PS.

On the XP machine files opened in PS appear much darker than with these other programs. It seems to affect only PS, whatever it is. It is disconcerting to see the difference in PS and in the Epson print preview box which opens in PS in the print dialog.

The gamma of the files seems quite similar in all situations between the two machines except for PS on the XP box.

There is no difference in my color management settings between the two machines (I keep the old one as backup), and for the life of me I can’t figure out what’s going on. At what point are gamma settings independent of monitor calibration in PS? I’ve been through the color management tab in PS and can’t seem to correct this problem there, but perhaps there is something hidden somewhere I have not tried.

Any suggestions would be appreciated…

TIA,
Different monitors?



Hecate – The Real One

veni, vidi, reliqui
T
Toby
Sep 25, 2004
That wouldn’t explain why there is a different gamma between ACDSee and PS on one machine and not on the other. I’ve switched monitors and the problem persists.

Toby

"Hecate" wrote in message
On 23 Sep 2004 12:19:07 -0500, "Toby" wrote:

Hi all,

I recently put together a new machine and installed my copy of Photoshop CS
on it. This box has Win XP, my old one is running W2K. Setup is the same; the monitors are calibrated using a Spyder and not running Adobe Gamma.
On the old machine, the appearance of files opened in PS is quite similar to
what is displayed using other graphics programs, including ACDSee, ThumbsUp
, webviewing the uploaded files on Renderosity, and in the Epson print preview within PS.

On the XP machine files opened in PS appear much darker than with these other programs. It seems to affect only PS, whatever it is. It is disconcerting to see the difference in PS and in the Epson print preview box
which opens in PS in the print dialog.

The gamma of the files seems quite similar in all situations between the two
machines except for PS on the XP box.

There is no difference in my color management settings between the two machines (I keep the old one as backup), and for the life of me I can’t figure out what’s going on. At what point are gamma settings independent of
monitor calibration in PS? I’ve been through the color management tab in PS
and can’t seem to correct this problem there, but perhaps there is something
hidden somewhere I have not tried.

Any suggestions would be appreciated…

TIA,
Different monitors?



Hecate – The Real One

veni, vidi, reliqui
P
possible
Sep 25, 2004
Two variables may be the cause. The video cards on the two machines are probably different. Calibration with Spyder will change the LUT (and gamma?) on a video card. There there is XP, which can do strange things.

Toby wrote:
That wouldn’t explain why there is a different gamma between ACDSee and PS on one machine and not on the other. I’ve switched monitors and the problem persists.

Toby

"Hecate" wrote in message
On 23 Sep 2004 12:19:07 -0500, "Toby" wrote:

Hi all,

I recently put together a new machine and installed my copy of Photoshop CS
on it. This box has Win XP, my old one is running W2K. Setup is the same; the monitors are calibrated using a Spyder and not running Adobe Gamma.
On the old machine, the appearance of files opened in PS is quite similar to
what is displayed using other graphics programs, including ACDSee, ThumbsUp
, webviewing the uploaded files on Renderosity, and in the Epson print preview within PS.

On the XP machine files opened in PS appear much darker than with these other programs. It seems to affect only PS, whatever it is. It is disconcerting to see the difference in PS and in the Epson print preview box
which opens in PS in the print dialog.

The gamma of the files seems quite similar in all situations between the two
machines except for PS on the XP box.

There is no difference in my color management settings between the two machines (I keep the old one as backup), and for the life of me I can’t figure out what’s going on. At what point are gamma settings independent of
monitor calibration in PS? I’ve been through the color management tab in PS
and can’t seem to correct this problem there, but perhaps there is something
hidden somewhere I have not tried.

Any suggestions would be appreciated…

TIA,
Different monitors?



Hecate – The Real One

veni, vidi, reliqui

How to Master Sharpening in Photoshop

Give your photos a professional finish with sharpening in Photoshop. Learn to enhance details, create contrast, and prepare your images for print, web, and social media.

Related Discussion Topics

Nice and short text about related topics in discussion sections