Desaturate brush?

R
Posted By
Rick
Aug 1, 2005
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603
Replies
16
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Closed
There’s several tools that allow you to apply saturation to an area of an image, but I don’t see a way to apply desaturation using a tool, such as a brush.

How can I do this?

PS CS v8.0 (Mac)

Thanks,

Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn’t ask a question here if I hadn’t done that already.

DaveC

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Gummo
Aug 1, 2005
"DaveC" wrote in message
There’s several tools that allow you to apply saturation to an area of an image, but I don’t see a way to apply desaturation using a tool, such as a brush.

Did you try the Sponge tool which is in with the Dodge and Burn tools?

Gummo
K
Kingdom
Aug 1, 2005
"Gummo" wrote in
news:A7tHe.8388$:

"DaveC" wrote in message
There’s several tools that allow you to apply saturation to an area of an image, but I don’t see a way to apply desaturation using a tool, such as a brush.

Did you try the Sponge tool which is in with the Dodge and Burn tools?
Gummo

It’s a yucky yuky tool, better to duplicate the layer, select or crop the area you want etc. adjust saturation or whatever you want then use feather and opacity to finish. some time you get little bonuses using colour modes too.


f=Ma well, nearly…
S
SJB
Aug 1, 2005
I assume that you want to use "selective" desaturation, which is why you are looking for a brush tool. If that is the case, try this:

– Copy your image to a new layer (always a good idea to "do stuff" to a copy instead of the original.)
– Desaturate the entire image using your preferred method … I like to use calculations myself.
– Make this desaturated layer the source for your history brush (click the box to the left of the layer in the history palette)
– In the History palette then go back one step
– Select the history brush and reduce the opacity to around 20% (this way you can build-up the amount of desaturation that you want) – Start "painting" onto your image where you want it to be desaturated.

Enjoy.

By the way if you set the colour image to the history source and paint on the desaturated layer with the history brush you’ll also be able to add selective saturation to a monochrome image.

Hope this helps.

SB

"DaveC" wrote in message
There’s several tools that allow you to apply saturation to an area of an image, but I don’t see a way to apply desaturation using a tool, such as a brush.

How can I do this?

PS CS v8.0 (Mac)

Thanks,

Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn’t ask a question here if I hadn’t done that already.

DaveC

This is an invalid return address
Please reply in the news group
D
DBLEXPOSURE
Aug 1, 2005
"DaveC" wrote in message
There’s several tools that allow you to apply saturation to an area of an image, but I don’t see a way to apply desaturation using a tool, such as a brush.

How can I do this?

PS CS v8.0 (Mac)

Thanks,

Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn’t ask a question here if I hadn’t done that already.

DaveC

This is an invalid return address
Please reply in the news group

Copy your orignal to your clipboard, Now desatureate the image, Now do an edit/paste. Now you have the original as layer 1 and the desatureated as your BG layer. Use your eraser tool, set to be as soft as it can be, with an opacity of around 50%. Use the eraser tool to brush in the desatureated image… Tada….

http://imagequest,netfirms.com
K
KatWoman
Aug 1, 2005
"DaveC" wrote in message
There’s several tools that allow you to apply saturation to an area of an image, but I don’t see a way to apply desaturation using a tool, such as a brush.

How can I do this?

PS CS v8.0 (Mac)

Thanks,

Please, no "Go Google this" replies. I wouldn’t ask a question here if I hadn’t done that already.

DaveC

This is an invalid return address
Please reply in the news group

the same tools that saturate have desat options look at the top tool bar drop down
you don’t need google it’s in the built in help under tools

tools>sponge>has saturate or desaturate options, contrary to Kingdom’s advice I use this tool quite frequently when I want to freely "paint" areas by hand. (large soft brush, low percentage of change like 7%)

Or layers palette> half moon> Hue/Saturation center slider will saturate or desaturate

you can adjust the image directly by image>adjustments>hue/sat

or a portion of it using masks and selections

to mess with individual colors you may want to try channel mixer or selective color
O
Owamanga
Aug 1, 2005
On Mon, 1 Aug 2005 14:29:28 -0400, "SJB" wrote:

I assume that you want to use "selective" desaturation, which is why you are looking for a brush tool. If that is the case, try this:
– Copy your image to a new layer (always a good idea to "do stuff" to a copy instead of the original.)
– Desaturate the entire image using your preferred method … I like to use calculations myself.
– Make this desaturated layer the source for your history brush (click the box to the left of the layer in the history palette)
– In the History palette then go back one step
– Select the history brush and reduce the opacity to around 20% (this way you can build-up the amount of desaturation that you want) – Start "painting" onto your image where you want it to be desaturated.
Enjoy.

By the way if you set the colour image to the history source and paint on the desaturated layer with the history brush you’ll also be able to add selective saturation to a monochrome image.

Hope this helps.

That would work. But if you don’t like using the history brush for some reason a dupe layer + layer mask, using a similar approach to above would also do it. This way you can continue adding or subtracting stuff to the mask in any sequence you want, using whatever drawing tools you want.


Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
T
Tacit
Aug 2, 2005
In article ,
"DBLEXPOSURE" wrote:

Copy your orignal to your clipboard, Now desatureate the image, Now do an edit/paste. Now you have the original as layer 1 and the desatureated as your BG layer. Use your eraser tool, set to be as soft as it can be, with an opacity of around 50%. Use the eraser tool to brush in the desatureated image… Tada….

That’s the hard way to do it.

It is not necessary to copy/paste. Instead, just drag the background layer in the Layers palette to the "new layer" button at the bottom of the Layers palette, or use Select All and then hit Control-J. Either one makes a new layer without using the Clipboard, which is slower and uses a lot more RAM.


Art, photography, shareware, polyamory, literature, kink: all at http://www.xeromag.com/franklin.html
T
Tacit
Aug 2, 2005
In article ,
DaveC wrote:

There’s several tools that allow you to apply saturation to an area of an image, but I don’t see a way to apply desaturation using a tool, such as a brush.

How can I do this?

There is a desaturate tool. It looks like a sponge.

Look closely at the tools in the Toolbar. Many of them have a tiny triangle in the lower right-hand corner. If you click your mouse on one of these tools and hold down the button, additional tools appear. The sponge tool is beneath another tool.


Art, photography, shareware, polyamory, literature, kink: all at http://www.xeromag.com/franklin.html
D
DBLEXPOSURE
Aug 2, 2005
"tacit" wrote in message
In article ,
"DBLEXPOSURE" wrote:

Copy your orignal to your clipboard, Now desatureate the image, Now do an
edit/paste. Now you have the original as layer 1 and the desatureated as your BG layer. Use your eraser tool, set to be as soft as it can be, with
an opacity of around 50%. Use the eraser tool to brush in the desatureated
image… Tada….

That’s the hard way to do it.

It is not necessary to copy/paste. Instead, just drag the background layer in the Layers palette to the "new layer" button at the bottom of the Layers palette, or use Select All and then hit Control-J. Either one makes a new layer without using the Clipboard, which is slower and uses a lot more RAM.


Art, photography, shareware, polyamory, literature, kink: all at http://www.xeromag.com/franklin.html

Yes, But having the original on the clipboard can save your ass sometimes…

If you suffer from slow or to little ram syndrome the I would agree.
E
edjh
Aug 2, 2005
Kingdom wrote:
/snip/
It’s a yucky yuky tool, better to duplicate the layer, select or crop the area you want etc. adjust saturation or whatever you want then use feather and opacity to finish. some time you get little bonuses using colour modes too.
If you don’t like the Sponge tool, try this one;
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/sponge.jpg


Comic book sketches and artwork:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/edjh.html
Comics art for sale:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/batsale.html
N
noone
Aug 2, 2005
In article <VwIHe.625$
says…
Kingdom wrote:
/snip/
It’s a yucky yuky tool, better to duplicate the layer, select or crop the area you want etc. adjust saturation or whatever you want then use feather and opacity to finish. some time you get little bonuses using colour modes too.
If you don’t like the Sponge tool, try this one;
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/sponge.jpg


Comic book sketches and artwork:
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/edjh.html

Yes, probably much more "user friendly!"

Good laugh. Glad I had just swallowed my coffee, or I’d be cleaning my laptop.

Hunt
T
Tacit
Aug 2, 2005
In article ,
"DBLEXPOSURE" wrote:

Yes, But having the original on the clipboard can save your ass sometimes…

That’s what the History Snapshot is for. 🙂


Art, photography, shareware, polyamory, literature, kink: all at http://www.xeromag.com/franklin.html
D
DBLEXPOSURE
Aug 2, 2005
"tacit" wrote in message
In article ,
"DBLEXPOSURE" wrote:

Yes, But having the original on the clipboard can save your ass sometimes…

That’s what the History Snapshot is for. 🙂


Art, photography, shareware, polyamory, literature, kink: all at http://www.xeromag.com/franklin.html

Do they not use the same phisical memory?
T
Tacit
Aug 2, 2005
In article ,
"DBLEXPOSURE" wrote:

Do they not use the same phisical memory?

Snapshot gets dumped into the temporary file. Clipboard contents may remain in physical RAM or in the system scrap when you change applications, depending on whether or not you’ve told Photoshop to export the clipboard.


Art, photography, shareware, polyamory, literature, kink: all at http://www.xeromag.com/franklin.html
H
Hecate
Aug 2, 2005
On Tue, 02 Aug 2005 11:10:45 GMT, edjh wrote:

Kingdom wrote:
/snip/
It’s a yucky yuky tool, better to duplicate the layer, select or crop the area you want etc. adjust saturation or whatever you want then use feather and opacity to finish. some time you get little bonuses using colour modes too.
If you don’t like the Sponge tool, try this one;
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/sponge.jpg

Probably more use than the original! LOL!



Hecate – The Real One

Fashion: Buying things you don’t need, with money
you don’t have, to impress people you don’t like…
N
noone
Aug 2, 2005
In article ,
says…
On Tue, 02 Aug 2005 11:10:45 GMT, edjh wrote:

Kingdom wrote:
/snip/
It’s a yucky yuky tool, better to duplicate the layer, select or crop the area you want etc. adjust saturation or whatever you want then use feather and opacity to finish. some time you get little bonuses using colour modes too.
If you don’t like the Sponge tool, try this one;
http://www.sover.net/~hannigan/sponge.jpg

Probably more use than the original! LOL!



Hecate – The Real One

Actually, I use the other side of that brush (the Saturate/Desaturate one) to tweak the greens in foreground desert plants. They have a tendency to look rather grey-green, especially in the Summer. A light touch, light Opacity, and maybe even the Airbrush option with a soft-edged brush do just the trick. Now, if I had an entire hedgerow, or forest to do, I’d mask and use Adjustment Layers, but for a few aloes and yuccas, Saturate Tool is my first choice.

Hunt

PS SBSP option must be in the CS3-beta, as I don’t seem to have it in CS-2.

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