Resizing for desktop and neighborhood photo lab

B
Posted By
Bryan
Jan 31, 2005
Views
468
Replies
6
Status
Closed
A little help with resizing, please.

I want to resize my digital photos so that they will print out as photo-quality 4×6’s using Costco Photo Lab services. The photo’s are shot as 2288×1712 HQ Olympus Camedia C-4000 Zoom images. The originals will be left as is, but the resized jpg’s will be placed on cd’s for friends or used as source for hard copy 4×6’s at my local Costco lab.

I’ve been correcting the levels and colors, then saving as max quality jpg’s. What’s the proper way to resize these edited images?

I tried Resize:
Pixel Size:1024(w) x 768 (h)
Resolution: 300 ppi

and the document size ends up as a 3.4×2.5 (inches) image.

I chose 300 ppi so that it would have decent print quality and I chose 1024×768 so that the images would fit without adjustment onto the desktop as wallpaper or slideshow images.

If I increase the pixel size so that the document size ends up around 8×10 then the pixel size is huge!

What should I be doing?

Again, my goal is to have resized and edited jpg’s that will print as 4×6’s at photo quality using my local costco photo lab and that will also fit well onto my desktop.

Thank you

P.S., I’ll see what I can find with google as well.
R
RSD99
Jan 31, 2005
It depends on what printer your branch of Costco uses.

They have a nice brochure that describes their services, titled "Professional Digital Printing Services" and their printer’s profiles are maintained and available at Dry Creek Photo’s web site.
www.drycreekphoto.com

The printer’s available apparently are (with the proper file size for a 4" x 6" print)

Noritsu QSS 2901 ….. 400 ppi ….. 1600 x 2400
Noritsu QSS 3101 ….. 320 ppi ….. 1280 x 1920
Fuji Frontier ………….. 300 ppi ……1200 x 1800

And … they usually print out at the correct size (based on the ppi) when you do your part.

You also asked:
"…
If I increase the pixel size so that the document size ends up around 8×10 then the pixel size is huge!
…."

8" x 10" for the Fuji Frontier is not really that "hugh" … if you are accustomed to working with digital images. 8" x 10" for the Frontier (300 ppi) is roughly 7.8 megapixels, or roughly 23 megabytes.I routinely do 12" x 18" at my local Costco … which uses the Noritsu QS-3101 … and always use uncompressed RGB TIFF files. The file size is normally 22 megapixels …. or roughly 63.3 megabytes … but that’s why we have inexpensive recordable CD’s, isn’t it?

"Bryan" wrote in message
A little help with resizing, please.

I want to resize my digital photos so that they will print out as photo-quality 4×6’s using Costco Photo Lab services. The photo’s are
shot
as 2288×1712 HQ Olympus Camedia C-4000 Zoom images. The originals will
be
left as is, but the resized jpg’s will be placed on cd’s for friends or
used
as source for hard copy 4×6’s at my local Costco lab.

I’ve been correcting the levels and colors, then saving as max quality jpg’s. What’s the proper way to resize these edited images?
I tried Resize:
Pixel Size:1024(w) x 768 (h)
Resolution: 300 ppi

and the document size ends up as a 3.4×2.5 (inches) image.
I chose 300 ppi so that it would have decent print quality and I chose 1024×768 so that the images would fit without adjustment onto the desktop
as
wallpaper or slideshow images.

If I increase the pixel size so that the document size ends up around
8×10
then the pixel size is huge!

What should I be doing?

Again, my goal is to have resized and edited jpg’s that will print as
4×6’s
at photo quality using my local costco photo lab and that will also fit
well
onto my desktop.

Thank you

P.S., I’ll see what I can find with google as well.

B
Bryan
Feb 3, 2005
I’ve got a lot of basic questions!

If I understand you correctly, you’re suggesting that I set my ppi to 320 and my pixel size to 1280×1920 for a final print of 4×6 for the Noritsu QSS 3101. Is this correct? Do I need different settings for different final print sizes; e.g., 5×7 or 8×10?

One of the things I’m confused about is the relationship between pixel size and it’s effect on document size in the adobe resizing window. As I decrease the pixel size in the resizing window, the document size (or image on paper) gets smaller. What’s the relationship between pixel size, ppi, document size (image on paper), and print size (photo printed at Costco)?

Thanks for the dry creek link and other info.

"RSD99" wrote in message
It depends on what printer your branch of Costco uses.

They have a nice brochure that describes their services, titled "Professional Digital Printing Services" and their printer’s profiles are maintained and available at Dry Creek Photo’s web site.
www.drycreekphoto.com

The printer’s available apparently are (with the proper file size for a 4" x 6" print)

Noritsu QSS 2901 ….. 400 ppi ….. 1600 x 2400
Noritsu QSS 3101 ….. 320 ppi ….. 1280 x 1920
Fuji Frontier ………….. 300 ppi ……1200 x 1800

And … they usually print out at the correct size (based on the ppi) when you do your part.

You also asked:
"…
If I increase the pixel size so that the document size ends up around 8×10 then the pixel size is huge!
…"

8" x 10" for the Fuji Frontier is not really that "hugh" … if you are accustomed to working with digital images. 8" x 10" for the Frontier (300 ppi) is roughly 7.8 megapixels, or roughly 23 megabytes.I routinely do 12" x 18" at my local Costco … which uses the Noritsu QS-3101 … and always use uncompressed RGB TIFF files. The file size is normally 22 megapixels … or roughly 63.3 megabytes … but that’s why we have inexpensive recordable CD’s, isn’t it?

"Bryan" wrote in message
A little help with resizing, please.

I want to resize my digital photos so that they will print out as photo-quality 4×6’s using Costco Photo Lab services. The photo’s are
shot
as 2288×1712 HQ Olympus Camedia C-4000 Zoom images. The originals will
be
left as is, but the resized jpg’s will be placed on cd’s for friends or
used
as source for hard copy 4×6’s at my local Costco lab.

I’ve been correcting the levels and colors, then saving as max quality jpg’s. What’s the proper way to resize these edited images?
I tried Resize:
Pixel Size:1024(w) x 768 (h)
Resolution: 300 ppi

and the document size ends up as a 3.4×2.5 (inches) image.
I chose 300 ppi so that it would have decent print quality and I chose 1024×768 so that the images would fit without adjustment onto the
desktop
as
wallpaper or slideshow images.

If I increase the pixel size so that the document size ends up around
8×10
then the pixel size is huge!

What should I be doing?

Again, my goal is to have resized and edited jpg’s that will print as
4×6’s
at photo quality using my local costco photo lab and that will also fit
well
onto my desktop.

Thank you

P.S., I’ll see what I can find with google as well.

R
RSD99
Feb 3, 2005
"Bryan" asked:
"…
If I understand you correctly, you’re suggesting that I set my ppi to 320 and my pixel size to 1280×1920 for a final print of 4×6 for the Noritsu QSS
3101. Is this correct?

…."

Yes

Then "Bryan" asked:
"…
Do I need different settings for different final print sizes; e.g., 5×7 or 8×10?
…."

Yes … OBVIOUSLY

First:
Go to the place where you will have your images printed.

Second:
Ask the main (or lead, or senior) mililab operator a few questions … such as

(a) What brand and model number is their printer?

(b) What are the standard print sizes on their printer’s menu?

(c) What is the ppi (some may erroneously call it dpi) of the printer?

Third:
Select a print size from 2b, above

Fourth:
Multiply the width of the print selection made in step three by the ppi found out in step 2c

Fifth:
Multiply the height of the print selection made in step three by the ppi found out in step 2c

Sixth:
Resize your picture to the dimensions determined in steps 4 and 5

Then … "Bryan" … asked:
"…
One of the things I’m confused about is the relationship between pixel size and it’s effect on document size in the adobe resizing window. …."

I’m not sure what your question really is here. The ‘Short Answer’ would be something like … believe the Adobe **PhotoShop** ‘Image/Resize’ window …. it is always correct. Some help in understanding this may be that there are three input boxes … one for width, one for height, and one for pixels per inch. Thus image size **in pixels** would be

(Width) x (pixels per inch) x (Height) x (pixels per inch) = Number of Pixels

And … The image size … in bytes … would then be

Number of pixels x 3 = File size at 24 bits per pixel (3 color … RGB)

It’s all relatively simple arithmetic … actually.

<Rant Mode>
Adobe is a company name. I do not understand what you mean when you say "… the adobe resizing window …"?

FWIW: Adobe Incorporated is one of the world’s largest computer software vendors, and their annual gross sales is very close to Micro$oft’s in total dollars. They sell several **hundred** different basic programs, and several thousand different high quality fonts every year.

Do you really mean something like "… the Adobe PhotoShop Elements ‘Image / Resize’ window …"

Please do *not* refer to your image editing program as "Adobe" … it makes you appear to know very little about what you are discussing. </Rant Mode>

"Bryan" wrote in message
I’ve got a lot of basic questions!

If I understand you correctly, you’re suggesting that I set my ppi to 320 and my pixel size to 1280×1920 for a final print of 4×6 for the Noritsu
QSS
3101. Is this correct? Do I need different settings for different final print sizes; e.g., 5×7 or 8×10?

One of the things I’m confused about is the relationship between pixel
size
and it’s effect on document size in the adobe resizing window. As I decrease the pixel size in the resizing window, the document size (or
image
on paper) gets smaller. What’s the relationship between pixel size, ppi, document size (image on paper), and print size (photo printed at Costco)?
Thanks for the dry creek link and other info.

L
Lenswork1
Feb 4, 2005
In addition to the responses you’ve already received regarding image size / pixels / printing, let me just add the following ‘general’ rule of thumb, that gives excellent printed results, regardless of what printer is used at what lab :

Multiply image size width and height (in inches) by 250 to get required number of pixels for a good print, i.e. for a good 8 x 10, image size in pixels should be 2000 (8 x 250) by 2500 ( 10 x 250) pixels. Use the ‘250’ rule for any print size ( 4×6, 5×7, etc.) and you should get excellent results on any printer.

Yes, you can get ‘better’ results’ above 250, and worse results below 250, but anything within +/- 20% of 250 will give good results 99% of the time.
B
Bryan
Feb 5, 2005
My local lab uses the Noritsu QSS 3111. I’ll have to check into those other 3 points: 1) the senior tech; 2) the print size (I’m assuming 4×6 because larger prints aren’t part of the 1 hour service plan); and 3) the ppi of the Noritsu QS 3111. And I’ll work on being more specific re: software (e.g., Adobe vs Adobe PSE 2.0).

Thank you

"RSD99" wrote in message
"Bryan" asked:
First:
Go to the place where you will have your images printed.
Second:
Ask the main (or lead, or senior) mililab operator a few questions …
such
as

(a) What brand and model number is their printer?

(b) What are the standard print sizes on their printer’s menu?
(c) What is the ppi (some may erroneously call it dpi) of the
printer?
Third:
Select a print size from 2b, above

Fourth:
Multiply the width of the print selection made in step three by the ppi found out in step 2c

Fifth:
Multiply the height of the print selection made in step three by the ppi found out in step 2c

Sixth:
Resize your picture to the dimensions determined in steps 4 and 5
Then … "Bryan" … asked:
"…
One of the things I’m confused about is the relationship between pixel
size
and it’s effect on document size in the adobe resizing window. …"

I’m not sure what your question really is here. The ‘Short Answer’ would
be
something like … believe the Adobe **PhotoShop** ‘Image/Resize’ window … it is always correct. Some help in understanding this may be that
there
are three input boxes … one for width, one for height, and one for
pixels
per inch. Thus image size **in pixels** would be

(Width) x (pixels per inch) x (Height) x (pixels per inch) = Number
of
Pixels

And … The image size … in bytes … would then be

Number of pixels x 3 = File size at 24 bits per pixel (3 color … RGB)

It’s all relatively simple arithmetic … actually.

<Rant Mode>
Adobe is a company name. I do not understand what you mean when you say "… the adobe resizing window …"?

FWIW: Adobe Incorporated is one of the world’s largest computer software vendors, and their annual gross sales is very close to Micro$oft’s in
total
dollars. They sell several **hundred** different basic programs, and several thousand different high quality fonts every year.
Do you really mean something like "… the Adobe PhotoShop Elements ‘Image / Resize’ window …"

Please do *not* refer to your image editing program as "Adobe" … it
makes
you appear to know very little about what you are discussing. </Rant Mode>

"Bryan" wrote in message
I’ve got a lot of basic questions!

If I understand you correctly, you’re suggesting that I set my ppi to
320
and my pixel size to 1280×1920 for a final print of 4×6 for the Noritsu
QSS
3101. Is this correct? Do I need different settings for different
final
print sizes; e.g., 5×7 or 8×10?

One of the things I’m confused about is the relationship between pixel
size
and it’s effect on document size in the adobe resizing window. As I decrease the pixel size in the resizing window, the document size (or
image
on paper) gets smaller. What’s the relationship between pixel size,
ppi,
document size (image on paper), and print size (photo printed at
Costco)?
Thanks for the dry creek link and other info.

B
Bryan
Feb 5, 2005
Let’s see:
I just printed 4 copies of 1 photo each at different settings. The original photo was shot with an Olympus C-4000 at HQ 2288×1720 settings. This photo was downloaded to a folder on my computer. I opened this photo with Adobe Photoshop Elements 2.0 and saved as a max quality jpg after making some minor adjustments.

My next step was to resize this saved jpg photo using the PSE 2.0 image|resize tools. I adjusted the ppi of one copy to 320 and 3×3 document size and the pixel size to 2288×1712; a second copy at 72ppi and 10×14 document size and 1024×766; a third copy to 72 ppi and 23×32 doc size and 2288×1712; and a fourth copy to 320ppi and 5×7 doc size and 2288×1712.

I saved each of these images to cd and had the lab print each as a 4×6. Result: I can’t tell the difference between photos in terms of quality. Is there something wrong with my experiment or was 4×6 not big enough to show a difference at the settings each photo was resized to?

I also printed photos as tif vs jpg using the same 2288×1720 camera settings and couldn’t tell the difference in print.

Is there an experiment I can try using my camera, Adobe PSE 2.0 and the Noritsu QS 3111 that will demonstrate the difference in output based on settings?

Thanks

"Lenswork1" wrote in message
In addition to the responses you’ve already received regarding image size / pixels / printing, let me just add the following ‘general’ rule of thumb, that gives excellent printed results, regardless of what printer is used at what lab :

Multiply image size width and height (in inches) by 250 to get required number of pixels for a good print, i.e. for a good 8 x 10, image size in pixels should be 2000 (8 x 250) by 2500 ( 10 x 250) pixels. Use the ‘250’ rule for any print size ( 4×6, 5×7, etc.) and you should get excellent results on any printer.

Yes, you can get ‘better’ results’ above 250, and worse results below 250, but anything within +/- 20% of 250 will give good results 99% of the time.

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