Scale from digital image to 6x4inch

MC
Posted By
Mark_Cawte
Jan 9, 2004
Views
453
Replies
6
Status
Closed
Hi

I would like to get prints from my digital camera size to a photo lab for printing 4" x 6" or 7" x 5" which I can do manualy, I have batches of a couple of hundred images that if I scale manualy I get 6"x4.5" or 7"x5.25" then crop the little bits afterwards.
I would like to know is there a way of converting 30+ images all at 6"x4.5" or 7"x5.25" through a batch process?

my image in from the digital camera is W564.44mm x H423.33mm @ 72 Pixel/Inch.

Thanks for any help

Mark
TD
Thee_DarkOverLord
Jan 9, 2004
Photoshop has a good help file.

The Batch command lets you play an action on a folder of files and subfolders. If you have a digital camera or a scanner with a document feeder, you can also import and process multiple images with a single action. Your scanner or digital camera may need an acquire plug-in module that supports actions. (If the third-party plug-in wasn’t written to import multiple documents at a time, it may not work during batch-processing or if used as part of an action. Contact the plug-in’s manufacturer for further information.)

When batch-processing files, you can leave all the files open, close and save the changes to the original files, or save modified versions of the files to a new location (leaving the originals unchanged). If you are saving the processed files to a new location, you may want to create a new folder for the processed files before starting the batch.

For better batch performance, reduce the number of saved history states and deselect the Automatically Create First Snapshot option in the History palette.

To batch-process files using the Batch command:

Choose File > Automate > Batch.
For Play, choose the desired set and action from the Set and Action pop-up menus. For Source, choose a source from the pop-up menu:
Folder to play the action on files already stored on your computer. Click Choose to locate and select the folder.
Import to import and play the action on images from a digital camera or scanner. Opened Files to play the action on all open files.
File Browser to play the action on the selected files in the File Browser. Select Override Action "Open" Commands if you want Open commands in the action to refer to the batched files, rather than the filenames specified in the action. If you select this option, the action must contain an Open command because the Batch command will not automatically open the source files.
Deselect Override Action "Open" Commands if the action was recorded to operate on open files or if the action contains Open commands for specific files that are required by the action.

Select Include All Subfolders to process files in subfolders. Select Suppress Color Profile Warnings to turn off display of color policy messages. Choose a destination for the processed files from the Destination menu: None to leave the files open without saving changes (unless the action includes a Save command). Save and Close to save the files in their current location, overwriting the original files. Folder to save the processed files to another location. Click Choose to specify the destination folder.
Select Override Action "Save As" Commands if you want Save As commands in the action to refer to the batched files, rather than the filenames and locations specified in the action. If you select this option, the action must contain a a Save As command because the Batch command will not automatically save the source files.
Deselect Override Action "Save As" Commands if the action contains Save As commands for specific files that are required by the action.

If you chose Folder as the destination, specify a file-naming convention and select file compatibility options for the processed files:
For File Naming, select elements from the pop-up menus or enter text into the fields to be combined into the default names for all files. The fields let you change the order and formatting of the filename parts. You must include at least one field that is unique for every file (for example, filename, serial number, or serial letter) to prevent files from overwriting each other.
For File Name Compatibility, choose Windows, Mac OS, and UNIX to make filenames compatible with Windows, Mac OS, and UNIX operating systems.
Saving files using the Batch command options always saves the files in the same format as the original files. To create a batch process that saves files in a new format, record the Save As command followed by the Close command as part of your original action. Then choose Override Action "Save In" Commands for the Destination when setting up the batch process.

Select an option for error processing from the Errors pop-up menu: Stop for Errors to suspend the process until you confirm the error message. Log Errors to File to record each error in a file without stopping the process. If errors are logged to a file, a message appears after processing. To review the error file, click Save As and name the error file.
To batch-process using multiple actions, create a new action and record the Batch command for each action you want to use. This technique also lets you process multiple folders in a single batch. To batch-process multiple folders, create aliases within a folder to the other folders you want to process, and select the Include All Subfolders option.
L
larry
Jan 9, 2004
I would resize by using Automate>Fit Image and make sure the long dimension is equal to the long dimension of the print size. Then add canvas to make the images all 4×6 or 5×7. Make sure to get the pixels per inch consistant. The problem you’ll have by not adding canvas is that the images don’t fit the proportion of a standard photographic print.
<http://bermangraphics.com/coolpix/frontiersizing.htm>

Work on a folder of duplicate images so you don’t overwrite the originals.

Larry Berman
RW
Rene_Walling
Jan 9, 2004
Mark,

I would get in touch with the photolab who will do the printing and find out if you even need to resize the images. The main drawback is that the cropping is centered by default and that may not be what you want.

I work with Fuji Frontiers and they crop automatically, so we don’t require our customers to resize anything unless they are picky about the cropping.
BO
Burton_Ogden
Jan 9, 2004
Rene,

I work with Fuji Frontiers and they crop automatically, so we don’t require our customers to resize anything unless they are picky about the cropping.

I think a lot of people are simply unaware that cropping is being done to their prints. If they were aware, they might want to to have a voice in what part of their image gets cut off. For many photos taken in candid situations, the framing of the subject of interest is not always perfect and it may be that one edge or the other of a photo contains an item of interest. Automatic cropping can butcher many photos. I spend a lot of care with my cropping in Photoshop, even when it doesn’t have to be done, like in making 4×6 prints from 35mm negatives. I try to crop for good composition, and that can involve a good deal of thought.

I think you would be surprised how many people, when considering whether to have 4×6 or 5×7 prints made from their 35mm film, don’t realize that the 5×7 prints will not show all of their images.

— Burton —
L
larry
Jan 9, 2004
Backing up a message.
There is a setting in the software to not crop the image when printing with the Frontier. But I’ve never worked with a one hour photo lab that even knew it existed. Given a choice between cropping and filling up the paper or adding canvas and making the image smaller and have it not fit in a frame, most would opt for the former and complain. That’s what the term "machine printing" is all about. Giving up the creative decisions to a person who looks at pressing the print button as a 9 to 5 job.

I regularly teach people how to get excellent quality prints from the Frontier and Noritsu printers by preparing their files properly.

Larry Berman
RW
Rene_Walling
Jan 10, 2004
Burton,

1st paragraph: that is why I warned Mark about automatic cropping not being want he necessarily wants. I also assumed that since mark wanted to batch process files, the cropping wasn’t a critical thing since just like the Frontier he wouldn’t be doing each image one at a time. My idea was to save him time and effort.

2nd paragraph: after 10 years, unfortunately, no I would not be surprised.

There is a setting in the software to not crop the image when printing with the Frontier.

Larry, I know of this option, but I also know a lot of Frontier operators are not aware of it, so that’s the assumption I make when discussing Frontier outputs we won’t be working on.

In the end, both of you are right, nothing beats preparing everything the way you want it so you get your prints the way you want it.

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